Dr Dingle's Blog / weight

Fasting reverses Type 2 diabetes

Fasting reverses Type 2 diabetes

Despite what we are often told the overwhelming evidence shows that Type 2 diabetes is a diet and lifestyle illness. It also shows that when you reverse the conditions that caused it the disease is also reversible.

Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a chronic disease closely linked to the epidemic of obesity that requires long-term medical attention to limit the development of its wide range of complications. Many of these complications arise from the combination of resistance to insulin action, inadequate insulin secretion, and excessive or inappropriate glucagon secretion. Approximately 10% of the population of the USA and Canada have a diagnosis of T2D, and the morbidity and mortality rates associated with it are fairly high. The economic burden of T2D in the USA is $245 billion and around $20 billion in Australia.

This case documents three patients referred to the Intensive Dietary Management clinic in Toronto, Canada, for insulin-dependent type 2 diabetes. It demonstrates the effectiveness of therapeutic fasting to reverse their insulin resistance, resulting in cessation of insulin therapy while maintaining control of their blood sugars. In addition, these patients were also able to lose significant amounts of body weight, reduce their waist circumference and also reduce their glycated haemoglobin level.

These three cases exemplify that therapeutic fasting may reduce insulin requirements in T2D. Given the rising cost of insulin, patients may potentially save significant money. Further, the reduced need for syringes and blood glucose monitoring may reduce patient discomfort.

Therapeutic fasting has the potential to fill this gap in diabetes care by providing similar intensive caloric restriction and hormonal benefits as bariatric surgery without the invasive and dangerous surgery. During fasting periods, patients are allowed to drink unlimited amounts of very low-calorie fluids such as water, coffee, tea and bone broth. A general multivitamin supplement is encouraged to provide adequate micronutrients. Precise fasting schedules vary depending primarily on the patient’s preference, ranging from 16 hours to several days. On eating days, patients are encouraged to eat a diet low in sugar and refined carbohydrates, which decreases blood glucose and insulin secretion.

This means that patients with T2D can reverse their diseases without the worry of side effects and financial burden of many pharmaceuticals, as well as the unknown long-term risks and uncertainty of surgery, all by means of therapeutic fasting.

 

Source http://casereports.bmj.com/content/2018/bcr-2017-221854.full

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Lifestyle changes can add 14 years or more to your life. Not drugs

Lifestyle changes can add 14 years or more to your life. Not drugs

Americans have a shorter life expectancy compared with residents of almost all other high-income countries despite the fact that they spend more money on their health care (pharmaceuticals) than any other country.

In this study adopting five major health initiatives—regular exercise, a healthy diet, moderate drinking, not getting overweight or obese and not smoking can extend your life by around 14 years. Each of the healthy lifestyles lowers your chances of getting one of the chronic health problems, such as heart disease and cancer.

This study shows that healthier lifestyles would reduce the rate of premature death from heart disease by 75 per cent, and cancer deaths by 50 per cent, the researchers estimate.

This study yet again highlights the need to focus on lifestyle and diet and not on the pharmaceutical model of health. While there is consistent evidence showing their role in extending life and the quality of life there is virtually no evidence to show pharmaceuticals extend life. However roughly 50% of the lobbyists in the capitals are from pharmaceutical companies.

https://www.drdingle.com/collections/book-sales/products/overcoming-illness-pre-order

Source

Impact of Healthy Lifestyle Factors on Life Expectancies in the US Population.

http://circ.ahajournals.org/content/early/2018/04/25/CIRCULATIONAHA.117.032047

 

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A Pecan a day keeps the diabetes and cardiovascular disease away.

A Pecan a day keeps the diabetes and cardiovascular disease away.

A large amount of evidence has shown a high intake of tree nuts is associated with a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), mortality from type 2 diabetes (T2DM), and all-cause mortality.

In this study after 4 weeks on a pecan-rich diet the researchers saw beneficial changes in serum insulin, insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and beta cell function (HOMA-β) as well as cardiometabolic disease. That is a significant reduction in the risk of diabetes2, heart attacks and stroke.

Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are a leading cause of death worldwide, and is primarly caused by inflammation and oxidation. Within the past few decades, there has also been a dramatic increase in diet-related chronic diseases related to CVD risk, i.e., diabetes, obesity, and hypertension, in both industrialized and developing nations. The problem is only getting worse even though we spend more money on pharmaceuticals and the medical system than ever before. Increased production of reactive oxygen species, oxidative stress, and inflammation, are the leading causes of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), arterial hypertension, and dyslipidemia.

A growing body of evidence has shown that a high intake of nuts (all types) is associated with a reduced risk of CVD development, all-cause mortality, and mortality from diabetes. Indeed, a nut-containing diet also contributes to weight control and weight loss despite the large number of calories.

Bioactive compounds present in nuts, include essential fatty acids, vitamins and minerals, fiber, and phytochemicals, have all been shown to reduce inflammation, improving vascular reactivity as well as fasting glucose and insulin sensitivity, and by lowering oxidative stress. Numerous studies have now shown that consumption of nuts is effective in reducing oxidative stress and inflammation. Other studies have shown frequent nut consumption is associated with lower concentrations of inflammation (CRP, IL-6) and some endothelial (the artery lining) markers in clinical trials. In a study of 5,013 participants, a greater intake of nuts was associated with lower amounts of inflammatory biomarkers. Subjects with nut intake of five or more times per week had a 20% nearly 20% reduction in inflammation compared to those who never or almost never consumed nuts. Pistachio nuts, for example, reduce oxidative stress and inflammation. Pistachio kernels have anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties at lower doses than reported previously and decreased inflammation (TNF-α and IL-1β) in a dose-dependent way. That is, the more the participants consumed, the lower the inflammation.

EAT MORE NUTS

But not peanuts and cashews

For much more information on how to reverse diabetes and cardiovascular disease (and all chronic illness) “Overcoming Illness” our latest book is a must read.

https://www.drdingle.com/collections/frontpage/products/overcoming-illness-pre-order

 

Source

A Pecan-Rich Diet Improves Cardiometabolic Risk Factors in Overweight and Obese Adults: A Randomized Controlled Trial

Diane L. McKay 1,*, Misha Eliasziw 2, C. Y. Oliver Chen 1 and Jeffrey B. Blumberg 1http://www.mdpi.com/2072-6643/10/3/339/htm

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Eating more processed leads to more cancers including breast cancer

Eating more processed leads to more cancers including breast cancer

In the latest study of 104 980 participants every 10% increase in processed food lead to a 12% increase in the risk of overall cancer and an 11% increase for the risk of breast cancer. 18 per cent of the group was regularly eating  highly processed foods.

I see people, particularly young people who eat processed food 3 or more times a day. Junk breakfast cereals like nutrigrain, and take-aways or packet food for dinner and lunch. This is not food. These same people have a myriad of adverse health conditions and wonder why they are sick. Then later they develop cancer and wonder why. No person wants to die of cancer however with the exception of smoking, what we eat has a huge impact on our risk of cancer and of course every other form of chronic illness. This is a choice.

Processed foods often have a higher content of processed and saturated fat, added sugar and salt, along with a lower fibre and low nutrient density, with low vitamin, minerals and plant based nutrients. They contribute to inflammation, oxidation and acidosis which what feeds cancers and other chronic illness (see my book “Overcoming illness”).

In addition it has newly created carcinogenic contaminants such as acrylamide, heterocyclic amines, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons as a result of heat treating the food.  Packaged processed foods might also contain contaminants from the wrapping including phthalates and bisphenol A or food additives sodium nitrite in processed meat, titanium dioxide (TiO2, white food pigment) or emulsifiers now linked with gut illness and thought to cause cancer.

I have written extensively on all of this in my latest book “Overcoming illness”

Source

http://www.bmj.com/content/360/bmj.k322

https://www.drdingle.com/collections/frontpage/products/overcoming-illness-pre-order

 

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Another study shows artificial sweeteners help put on weight

Another study shows artificial sweeteners help put on weight

Advice on the artificial sweeteners are constantly dolled out to people from well meaning nutritionists, diabetic and heart associations around the world without looking at the science.

Weight loss is not just about calories in and calories out it is about the quality of the food and how your body uses it to its advantage or not. If it were just the balance between the calories then low fat, low calorie and artificial sweeteners would all work but hey don't. As yet another big study shows.

This study from the University of Manitoba in Canada brought the information together from 37 different studies and found people who consume artificial sweeteners weren't losing weight, and the longer studies which observed people for up to 10 years found they were putting on weight. Consumption of nonnutritive sweeteners was associated with increases in weight and waist circumference, and higher incidence of obesity, hypertension, metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular events compared to others who weren't using sweeteners.

While there is no doubt sugar consumption is fueling the global obesity epidemic epidemic it seems these non nutritive artificial sweeteners are also stoking this fire. Research which I have written about extensively in my book "Unlock Your Genes For Weight Loss" (https://www.drdingle.com/collections/book-sales/products/unlock-your-genes-for-weight-loss) has now shown these nonnutritive sweeteners paradoxically help put on weight even without any extra calories. And have have been shown to adverse effects on glucose metabolism, gut microbiota and appetite control and animal studies have shown that chronic exposure to nonnutritive sweeteners leads to increased food consumption, weight gain and adiposity.

Despite this overwhelming a evidence the position of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics is that nonnutritive sweeteners can help limit energy intake as a strategy to manage weight or blood glucose.

In our courses and our book we show the science behind weight loss is about the quality of the food you eat not the calories. Certain foods talk to you genes to get you to put on weight while other foods help you lose weight and regain your health.

http://tix.yt/permanentweightloss

 Source

http://www.cmaj.ca/content/189/28/E929

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Weight gain is not in the genes. It is in what you do to the genes

Weight gain is not in the genes. It is in what you do to the genes

Genetic determinism—that is, the notion that “it’s all in the genes,” that everything is determined by our DNA and that we are victims of our hereditary—is just not right. You and your conditions, including weight gain and obesity, are not determined by your DNA. In studies of separated twins of obese parents, children growing up in a thin family are more likely to grow up thin. If they grow up in an overweight family they are more likely to be overweight. It appears that while genes have a role in weight gain, it is the passing on of eating habits that are more important.

In recent years, a new idea has come to the forefront of genetics and is the focus of thousands of studies: epigenetics. It is now understood that obesity and weight gain and all the chronic diseases are linked to epigenetic triggers. The vast majority of conditions leading to weight gain are a result of complex interactions between genes and the environment; these interactions cannot be explained by classic genetics.

It is true that the genes we are born with may have an association with weight gain and disease, but this does not prove causation. The truth is only a very small number of people have “smoking gun” genes which predispose them to obesity, diabetes and heart disease. Although heritability is considered to be a major risk factor for weight gain and obesity, the almost 40 candidate genes identified by gene studies (GWAS) so far account for only five percent to 10% of the observed variance in body mass index in human subjects. Other research suggests that heredity may be responsible for less than one percent of the obesity crisis. All the genes combined explain a maximum of 0.9% of variation in human body mass index. So, if it’s not in the genes…

 

It’s all in the EPIgenes

Epigenetics provides the missing link between our environment and weight gain as well as all the chronic illnesses we suffer. Your genes are always responding, in good or bad ways, to what you eat, environmental toxins, your emotions, your stresses and your experiences, and to the nutritional microenvironment within each of your body’s cells. Environmental factors are capable of causing epigenetic changes in DNA that can potentially alter gene expression and result in weight gain and obesity or the opposite. Environmental influences—including nutrition, behaviour, chemicals, radiation and even stress and emotions—can silence or activate a gene without altering the genetic code in any way. These changes in gene expression, the so-called “turning on” of a gene, occur without any change to the DNA sequence.

Each nutrient, each interaction, each experience can therefore manifest itself through biochemical changes, which may have effects at birth or 40 years down the track, or even in the next generation or two. Some of the most well known studies linking epigenetics and obesity have involved the “Agouti” mice. A short-term dietary intervention in pregnant agouti mice, in the form of supplements of folic acid, vitamin B12, choline and betaine, has shown long lasting beneficial influences on the health and appearance of the offspring for multiple generations. The mice that did not get the nutritional supplementation became obese and developed the equivalent of metabolic syndrome and diabetes.

The GOOD news is that, while epigenetic changes can lead to an increase in weight gain and obesity, understanding epigenetics puts us in control. Not only can we avoid outcomes that were once thought of as “in our genes,” but also research is showing that, by changing our diet and lifestyle, we can reverse many of these conditions. Just as the genes for weight gain can be turned on, they can also—with the right information and actions—be turned off. Numerous studies have shown that changing our diet, lifestyle and environment alters our DNA. We are now in control.

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Understanding weight gain

Understanding weight gain

Weight gain is not just a fluke; it is a symptom of Western diet and lifestyle—our thoughts and actions being out of balance with our genetics and evolution. As incredible as this may sound, the ability to modify behaviour of your genes to influence weight loss is a key concept in this book. Epigenetics is the scientific field that looks at how genes interact with our diet, environment, lifestyle and even emotions, to change the expression of our genes for better or worse—and in the case of weight gain, for worse.

In a very real sense, everything that happens in our bodies ultimately takes place on a genetic level. Nothing happens without the genes being involved, either directly or indirectly. And the way our genes are programmed is largely a product of our environment and our evolution. A large body of research clearly shows that good health, abundant energy and weight management all rely on the normal functioning of genes which, in turn, depends on a healthy environment, diet and lifestyle. The research also shows that you can improve your weight and health, regardless of the genes with which you are born. You are not stuck with genes that make you gain weight.

Many of today’s health problems result from what amounts to a collision between ancient genetics and modern, highly processed foods. Our genes are routinely exposed to genetically unfamiliar foods and chemicals, and they respond abnormally, such as by triggering inflammation, chronic illness, low energy and weight gain. We evolved in a rich environment full of nutrient-dense foods and only the stress of the hunt—a very different scenario than our lives today. In times past, every calorie consumed came with large amounts of vitamins, minerals, proteins and healthy fats, relatively little starch and almost no grain. Many ancient diets were extraordinarily diverse, including up to a hundred different types of plant foods, as well as scores of land animals, many species of fish and wild bird eggs.

Today, we are living out of balance, and paying the price. It doesn’t take much to put on extra weight. Even small disturbances in energy balance may lead to the onset of obesity.

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Paleo diet good for weight loss in older women

Paleo diet good for weight loss in older women

The weight loss, low calorie, low fat don't eat anything nice diets have never worked for weight loss. In fact they can boomerang and cause muscle loss and weight gain. Postmenopausal women have an increased risk of obesity, for instance due to the reduction of oestrogen production in combination with an elevated energy intake and reduced physical activity.

The Paleo diet allows people to eat plenty of unsaturated fats and low-glycaemic carbohydrates—the ones that are lower in sugar—and specifically focuses on vegetables, lean meats, fish, poultry, eggs, shellfish, seeds, nuts and fruits, and excludes all grains and cereals, milk, refined sugars and added salt.

In this study of 70 overweight post-menopausal were either put on the Paleo diet or the Nordic Nutrition Recommendations diet, which is like the Paleo but allows cereals and grains, milk, refined sugars and added salt.Over the two years, women on the Paleo diet lost an average of nine kilos (20 lbs) while those following the Nordic diet lost an average of six kilos (13 lbs). But the biggest difference was the overall health of the Paleo-group women. They saw levels of risk factors of type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular diseases and enzymes involved in fat storage decrease. The weight loss in both dietary groups also contributed to reduced inflammation in both fat tissue and in the circulation which is the major cause of chronic illness. (https://www.drdingle.com/collections/frontpage/products/overcoming-illness-pre-order)

The good news is the women had "free reign" about the amount of food they could eat as long as it followed the guidelines.


“In conclusion, the study shows that the Paleolithic diet with a high

proportion of unsaturated fats was healthier for this group of women, even if the Nordic Nutrition Recommendations also had positive health effects,” says Caroline Blomquist.

Source. http://www.medfak.umu.se/english/about-the-faculty/news/newsdetailpage/paleolithic-diet-healthier-for-overweight-women.cid289548

Our next "7 steps to Permanent Weight Loss" is on Tuesday February 27 in North Perth. http://tix.yt/permanentweightloss

 

Learn

Why diets or exercise programs don't work

The role of hormones

7 simple steps to weight loss.

Which foods work best

The importance of...

But it is much more than the paleo

 

 

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Diabetes inflammation

Diabetes inflammation

Diabetes type 2 is just a symptom of a diseased lifestyle. It is probably our body’s mechanism to store food in times of food shortages (which we needed as hunter-gatherers when food shortage was a frequent occurrence). Now we have too much of the wrong food all of the time. The signs and symptoms of diabetes, including thirst and fatigue, are just messages to tell us to change. If we don’t change then we develop insulin resistance, which tells us that we already have too much food (energy) stored in the cell and to stop sending in the sugar. By this time we may have spent 10 or 20 years not listening to the body’s messages. Under normal conditions, our cells take the sugar out of the blood to provide us with the energy our cells need to function. If the sugar remains in the bloodstream, it causes damage to the blood and to cells in the blood. But when there is too much energy stored in the cells, the cells stop taking the sugar in, because we just can’t use any more. Blood sugar levels are also one of the best predictors of dementia later in life.

Although inflammation, oxidation and acidosis (IOA) are natural and essential for a healthy body, they can be seriously problematic if they become chronic and reoccurring as a result of our body being out of balance. Recent studies have established that the three conditions combined are a leading pathogenic force in the development of chronic diseases—including diabetes, cancers, cardiovascular disease, autoimmune diseases (including asthma and arthritis), osteoporosis, multiple sclerosis, dementia and even depression, obesity and premature ageing.

In modern medicine, we treat the condition that occurs down the line, such as diabetes, by giving the person blood-sugar-lowering drugs. This lowers the blood sugar but does not treat the condition that is causing the diabetic problem. The problem is not high levels of sugar in the blood; it is the damage that has been done, often over decades, by poor diet and lifestyle that have led to chronic inflammation, oxidation and acidosis, the combination of which eventually results in high blood sugar. High blood sugar is just the symptom; the damage is in the cells—in our powerhouse called the mitochondria—and is the result of inflammation, oxidation and acidosis.

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Stop being sick

Stop being sick

The current medical model, which focuses on treating the symptoms with toxic pharmaceuticals, rather than preventing illness, is simply not working. We use more drugs than ever before and we are sicker than ever before. Unfortunately, most of us are very sick by the time we recognise we are ill or decide to do anything about our health. It is never too late, but it is more difficult. By comparison, if you have not serviced your car for 20 years, you don’t expect to repair the damage with one oil change.

The key to treating chronic illness is to act sooner rather than later. As the adage goes, “Prevention is better than cure.” You can, however, take important, health-saving steps at any time.

We need a paradigm shift when it comes to our lifestyle and nutrition. Previously we thought of “nutrition” as the Food Pyramid, 2&5, the RDI (recommended daily intake/allowance) of vitamin C, B vitamins, iron and calcium, counting calories and choosing “low-fat” foods. This approach is outdated and extremely dangerous, and in fact is contributing significantly to the level of chronic illness we have today. We need a lot more nutrition and a great deal more variety—not just the minimum amount to prevent scurvy or beriberi, but the right amounts for optimal health.

In the beginning, there were healthy, whole foods and healthy lifestyles; people took responsibility for their own health. Now most of the world is dying from food-related illness. Half the world is dying from not enough food and the other half from too much nutrient-depleted, calorie-dense, contaminated food. Times have changed and so has the way we need to look at food, nutrition and our health. Chronic illnesses such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease and cancer are now the biggest killers in developed countries with the developing world rapidly catching up. Obesity has overtaken smoking as the single biggest cause of avoidable death in many developed countries.

Understanding some basics of chronic illness is the key to fixing the problem. The simplest place to start is with the underlying conditions that lead to chronic illness. This is what I call the “disease triad” of oxidation, inflammation, and acidosis. The triad, which you will read about in this book, is the underlying cause of all chronic illness in our bodies. The root cause of the illness, however, is what causes these three conditions, which are present in every form of chronic illness and prevent the body from healing and recovering. If we reduce them or even stop them from being out of control, then we can allow our bodies to heal. But the more advanced the chronic illness, the more we have to do in order to slow down and rebalance the triad. By the time modern medicine recognises that you have diabetes, blocked arteries or cancer, you have already had possibly decades of high inflammation, oxidation and acidosis.

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