Dr Dingle's Blog / toxin

Europe says BPA (bisphenol A) is an endocrine disruptor and needs to be regulated more heavily

Europe says BPA (bisphenol A) is an endocrine disruptor and needs to be regulated more heavily

BPA has received a lot of media attention over the last decade, primarily the effects of this chemical on our reproductive health and infants.

This week the European Chemicals Agency (ECHA) has classified bisphenol A, a chemical found in many common plastic products, as an endocrine disruptor and a ‘substance of very high concern’ due to its “probable serious effects to human health which give rise to an equivalent level of concern to carcinogenic, mutagenic, toxic to reproduction substances”.

France banned BPA in baby bottles in 2010 and in food containers in 2012. The new European classification for BPA follows a proposal by the French food security agency (ANSES) from February this year. ECHA’s member state committee, made up of representatives from all 28 EU countries, agreed the change unanimously on 16 June.

But nothing in Australia?

Despite its widely known health effects BPA is still used in a variety of consumer products containing epoxy resins, polyester-styrene, and polycarbonate plastics. It is added to various plastics in many different consumer products including plastic bottles while epoxy resins are used as protective coatings for metal food and beverage cans. It is found in every can and most plastic bottles unless they are labelled BPA free. Bisphenol A is extensively used in the food-packaging industry so even food take away wrappers may be contaminated with BPA. It is also found in thermal paper for receipts and fax, however, human exposure occurs mainly from the direct contact of food with Bisphenol A containing plastics. Other exposure routes that are of particular concern are Bisphenol A leaching from babies’ feeding bottles, and Bisphenol A BPA leaching from dental fillings and sealants. In one study BPA was detected in 15 conventional samples, including dish and laundry detergent, tub and tile cleaner, soaps, lotions, shampoo, conditioner, shaving cream, nail polish, and sunscreen. Overall, human exposure to BPA is frequent and widespread, and more than 90% of individuals have detectable amounts of BPA in urine as reported by studies around the world. In a study in the USA BPA was found in 92.6% of urine samples from 2,517 people across the country.

BPA was first reported to impact the reproductive system of female rats in the 1930s. Since then there have been hundreds of published studies showing BPA effects in animals even at very low levels (μg/kg/d) and at levels we would normally be exposed to on a daily basis. It appears that these low levels may even be more of problem on health that much higher levels.

I have written extensively on this in my new book Dangerous Beauty

https://www.drdingle.com/products/dangerous-beauty-pre-release

Read more →

Europe says BPA (bisphenol A) is an endocrine disruptor and needs to be regulated more heavily

Europe says BPA (bisphenol A) is an endocrine disruptor and needs to be regulated more heavily

BPA has received a lot of media attention over the last decade, primarily the effects of this chemical on our reproductive health and infants.

This week the European Chemicals Agency (ECHA) has classified bisphenol A, a chemical found in many common plastic products, as an endocrine disruptor and a ‘substance of very high concern’ due to its “probable serious effects to human health which give rise to an equivalent level of concern to carcinogenic, mutagenic, toxic to reproduction substances”.

France banned BPA in baby bottles in 2010 and in food containers in 2012. The new European classification for BPA follows a proposal by the French food security agency (ANSES) from February this year. ECHA’s member state committee, made up of representatives from all 28 EU countries, agreed the change unanimously on 16 June.

But nothing in Australia?

Despite its widely known health effects BPA is still used in a variety of consumer products containing epoxy resins, polyester-styrene, and polycarbonate plastics. It is added to various plastics in many different consumer products including plastic bottles while epoxy resins are used as protective coatings for metal food and beverage cans. It is found in every can and most plastic bottles unless they are labelled BPA free. Bisphenol A is extensively used in the food-packaging industry so even food take away wrappers may be contaminated with BPA. It is also found in thermal paper for receipts and fax, however, human exposure occurs mainly from the direct contact of food with Bisphenol A containing plastics. Other exposure routes that are of particular concern are Bisphenol A leaching from babies’ feeding bottles, and Bisphenol A BPA leaching from dental fillings and sealants. In one study BPA was detected in 15 conventional samples, including dish and laundry detergent, tub and tile cleaner, soaps, lotions, shampoo, conditioner, shaving cream, nail polish, and sunscreen. Overall, human exposure to BPA is frequent and widespread, and more than 90% of individuals have detectable amounts of BPA in urine as reported by studies around the world. In a study in the USA BPA was found in 92.6% of urine samples from 2,517 people across the country.

BPA was first reported to impact the reproductive system of female rats in the 1930s. Since then there have been hundreds of published studies showing BPA effects in animals even at very low levels (μg/kg/d) and at levels we would normally be exposed to on a daily basis. It appears that these low levels may even be more of problem on health that much higher levels.

I have written extensively on this in my new book Dangerous Beauty

https://www.drdingle.com/products/dangerous-beauty-pre-release

Read more →

Toxic Teflon

Toxic Teflon

Perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) are persistent synthetic chemicals that are widely used in industrial applications and often detectable in humans. Some PFASs have a long half-life (how long it takes for half of the chemical to break down and be eliminated from the body) in humans. For example, the half-life of perfluorooctanoate (PFOA- which is used in the production of teflon), perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), and perfluorohexanesulfonate (PFHxS) has been estimated at 3.8, 5.4, and 8.5 years, respectively. That is, they will be in your body for a many years even after one exposure.

In rats, PFASs can interfere with the estrous cycle and have been linked with reduced fecundity, indicated by increased time to pregnancy (TTP) and risks of infertility. Dysfunction of menstrual cycle is a major cause of infertility and lower fecundity. Animal and human evidences suggest that PFASs affect formation of steroid hormones and hormone levels manifesting in altered menstrual cycles such as prolonged lengths. A recent epidemiologic study suggested that menstrual cycles may be lengthened in women with the highest serum concentrations of PFOA in comparison to those with the lowest concentrations.

In this study of PFASs in 950 pre-pregnant women with higher levels had increased odds of self-reported history of irregular menstrual cycle, long menstrual cycle and levels were negatively associated with self-reported history of menorrhagia. The study concluded that certain PFASs are associated with abnormal menstruation in humans. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP1203

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Phthalates one step closer to being banned in Europe.

Phthalates one step closer to being banned in Europe.

In 2015 The EU banned the use of 4 phthalates (butylbenzyl phthalate (BBP), di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), dibutyl phthalate (DBP), and diisobutyl phthalate (DIBP)) but companies could seek—and have obtained—continued-use authorizations if there are no safer alternatives. However, very recently on June 20 2017, the EU went further and voted to remove the chemicals from consumer products that contain the phthalates at levels greater than 0.1% by weight by getting rid of any exemptions.

Phthalates are industrial chemicals often used to soften plastics in toys, household items such as food containers, and medical devices as well as construction materials, floorings, paints, lubricating oils, wood finishes, detergents, industrial plastics, pharmaceuticals, and as a plasticizer for polyvinyl chloride products. Phthalates have been increasingly added to cosmetic products such as perfumes, lotions, hairsprays, moisturisers, nail polish, deodorants, and ingredients in makeup, shampoos and soaps. They are used primarily at concentrations of less than 10% as plasticizers in products such as nail polishes (to reduce cracking by making polished nails less brittle) and hairsprays (to help avoid stiffness by allowing them to form a flexible film on the hair) and as solvents and perfume fixatives in various other products. Phthalates produce oily textures in lotions and they contribute to making skin feel soft and helping lotions penetrate deeper into the skin.

Some phthalates are included in personal care products because of their ability to hold colour, denature alcohol, and fix fragrance. Phthalates are also used as a fragrance base and as components of fragrances to make scents last longer. If a product’s label lists “fragrance” or “parfum,” it’s possible, even probable, that it contains phthalates (and parabens), as companies are not required to disclose fragrance components. Fragrance has emerged as the strongest predictor among PCPs of urinary concentrations of certain phthalate metabolites. In a 2012 study, the highest concentration of one particular phthalate was found in fragrance/perfume and car air freshener. Other products with high concentrations include car interior cleaner, tub/tile cleaner, bar soap, shaving cream, and lipstick. Interestingly, three different phthalates were found in so-called “alternative” products. These compounds may have been introduced as substitutes for the better-known anti-androgenic (testosterone) phthalates, even though they are also endocrine-disrupting chemicals.[2] An “alternative” shaving cream contained five different phthalates, illustrating the potential for simultaneous exposures to multiple phthalates, which act cumulatively and may act synergistically. What is worrying is that none of the products that were tested had “phthalate” on the label—including personal care products, which by law are required to list phthalates unless they are part of a secret fragrance ingredient. However, the conventional nail polish sample with measurable phthalate contained a product labelled “phthalic anhydride copolymer” which is just another phthalate. Phthalates are seldom listed on product labels in most countries because current regulations do not require listing individual fragrance components. It is obvious now that products marketed as “natural” may also contain phthalates, even though the consumer believes them to be “chemical-free.”

 

http://cen.acs.org/articles/95/i26/European-Union-further-restricts-four.html

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