Dr Dingle's Blog / obesity

Weight gain is not in the genes. It is in what you do to the genes

Weight gain is not in the genes. It is in what you do to the genes

Genetic determinism—that is, the notion that “it’s all in the genes,” that everything is determined by our DNA and that we are victims of our hereditary—is just not right. You and your conditions, including weight gain and obesity, are not determined by your DNA. In studies of separated twins of obese parents, children growing up in a thin family are more likely to grow up thin. If they grow up in an overweight family they are more likely to be overweight. It appears that while genes have a role in weight gain, it is the passing on of eating habits that are more important.

In recent years, a new idea has come to the forefront of genetics and is the focus of thousands of studies: epigenetics. It is now understood that obesity and weight gain and all the chronic diseases are linked to epigenetic triggers. The vast majority of conditions leading to weight gain are a result of complex interactions between genes and the environment; these interactions cannot be explained by classic genetics.

It is true that the genes we are born with may have an association with weight gain and disease, but this does not prove causation. The truth is only a very small number of people have “smoking gun” genes which predispose them to obesity, diabetes and heart disease. Although heritability is considered to be a major risk factor for weight gain and obesity, the almost 40 candidate genes identified by gene studies (GWAS) so far account for only five percent to 10% of the observed variance in body mass index in human subjects. Other research suggests that heredity may be responsible for less than one percent of the obesity crisis. All the genes combined explain a maximum of 0.9% of variation in human body mass index. So, if it’s not in the genes…

 

It’s all in the EPIgenes

Epigenetics provides the missing link between our environment and weight gain as well as all the chronic illnesses we suffer. Your genes are always responding, in good or bad ways, to what you eat, environmental toxins, your emotions, your stresses and your experiences, and to the nutritional microenvironment within each of your body’s cells. Environmental factors are capable of causing epigenetic changes in DNA that can potentially alter gene expression and result in weight gain and obesity or the opposite. Environmental influences—including nutrition, behaviour, chemicals, radiation and even stress and emotions—can silence or activate a gene without altering the genetic code in any way. These changes in gene expression, the so-called “turning on” of a gene, occur without any change to the DNA sequence.

Each nutrient, each interaction, each experience can therefore manifest itself through biochemical changes, which may have effects at birth or 40 years down the track, or even in the next generation or two. Some of the most well known studies linking epigenetics and obesity have involved the “Agouti” mice. A short-term dietary intervention in pregnant agouti mice, in the form of supplements of folic acid, vitamin B12, choline and betaine, has shown long lasting beneficial influences on the health and appearance of the offspring for multiple generations. The mice that did not get the nutritional supplementation became obese and developed the equivalent of metabolic syndrome and diabetes.

The GOOD news is that, while epigenetic changes can lead to an increase in weight gain and obesity, understanding epigenetics puts us in control. Not only can we avoid outcomes that were once thought of as “in our genes,” but also research is showing that, by changing our diet and lifestyle, we can reverse many of these conditions. Just as the genes for weight gain can be turned on, they can also—with the right information and actions—be turned off. Numerous studies have shown that changing our diet, lifestyle and environment alters our DNA. We are now in control.

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Understanding weight gain

Understanding weight gain

Weight gain is not just a fluke; it is a symptom of Western diet and lifestyle—our thoughts and actions being out of balance with our genetics and evolution. As incredible as this may sound, the ability to modify behaviour of your genes to influence weight loss is a key concept in this book. Epigenetics is the scientific field that looks at how genes interact with our diet, environment, lifestyle and even emotions, to change the expression of our genes for better or worse—and in the case of weight gain, for worse.

In a very real sense, everything that happens in our bodies ultimately takes place on a genetic level. Nothing happens without the genes being involved, either directly or indirectly. And the way our genes are programmed is largely a product of our environment and our evolution. A large body of research clearly shows that good health, abundant energy and weight management all rely on the normal functioning of genes which, in turn, depends on a healthy environment, diet and lifestyle. The research also shows that you can improve your weight and health, regardless of the genes with which you are born. You are not stuck with genes that make you gain weight.

Many of today’s health problems result from what amounts to a collision between ancient genetics and modern, highly processed foods. Our genes are routinely exposed to genetically unfamiliar foods and chemicals, and they respond abnormally, such as by triggering inflammation, chronic illness, low energy and weight gain. We evolved in a rich environment full of nutrient-dense foods and only the stress of the hunt—a very different scenario than our lives today. In times past, every calorie consumed came with large amounts of vitamins, minerals, proteins and healthy fats, relatively little starch and almost no grain. Many ancient diets were extraordinarily diverse, including up to a hundred different types of plant foods, as well as scores of land animals, many species of fish and wild bird eggs.

Today, we are living out of balance, and paying the price. It doesn’t take much to put on extra weight. Even small disturbances in energy balance may lead to the onset of obesity.

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Paleo diet good for weight loss in older women

Paleo diet good for weight loss in older women

The weight loss, low calorie, low fat don't eat anything nice diets have never worked for weight loss. In fact they can boomerang and cause muscle loss and weight gain. Postmenopausal women have an increased risk of obesity, for instance due to the reduction of oestrogen production in combination with an elevated energy intake and reduced physical activity.

The Paleo diet allows people to eat plenty of unsaturated fats and low-glycaemic carbohydrates—the ones that are lower in sugar—and specifically focuses on vegetables, lean meats, fish, poultry, eggs, shellfish, seeds, nuts and fruits, and excludes all grains and cereals, milk, refined sugars and added salt.

In this study of 70 overweight post-menopausal were either put on the Paleo diet or the Nordic Nutrition Recommendations diet, which is like the Paleo but allows cereals and grains, milk, refined sugars and added salt.Over the two years, women on the Paleo diet lost an average of nine kilos (20 lbs) while those following the Nordic diet lost an average of six kilos (13 lbs). But the biggest difference was the overall health of the Paleo-group women. They saw levels of risk factors of type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular diseases and enzymes involved in fat storage decrease. The weight loss in both dietary groups also contributed to reduced inflammation in both fat tissue and in the circulation which is the major cause of chronic illness. (https://www.drdingle.com/collections/frontpage/products/overcoming-illness-pre-order)

The good news is the women had "free reign" about the amount of food they could eat as long as it followed the guidelines.


“In conclusion, the study shows that the Paleolithic diet with a high

proportion of unsaturated fats was healthier for this group of women, even if the Nordic Nutrition Recommendations also had positive health effects,” says Caroline Blomquist.

Source. http://www.medfak.umu.se/english/about-the-faculty/news/newsdetailpage/paleolithic-diet-healthier-for-overweight-women.cid289548

Our next "7 steps to Permanent Weight Loss" is on Tuesday February 27 in North Perth. http://tix.yt/permanentweightloss

 

Learn

Why diets or exercise programs don't work

The role of hormones

7 simple steps to weight loss.

Which foods work best

The importance of...

But it is much more than the paleo

 

 

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Diabetes inflammation

Diabetes inflammation

Diabetes type 2 is just a symptom of a diseased lifestyle. It is probably our body’s mechanism to store food in times of food shortages (which we needed as hunter-gatherers when food shortage was a frequent occurrence). Now we have too much of the wrong food all of the time. The signs and symptoms of diabetes, including thirst and fatigue, are just messages to tell us to change. If we don’t change then we develop insulin resistance, which tells us that we already have too much food (energy) stored in the cell and to stop sending in the sugar. By this time we may have spent 10 or 20 years not listening to the body’s messages. Under normal conditions, our cells take the sugar out of the blood to provide us with the energy our cells need to function. If the sugar remains in the bloodstream, it causes damage to the blood and to cells in the blood. But when there is too much energy stored in the cells, the cells stop taking the sugar in, because we just can’t use any more. Blood sugar levels are also one of the best predictors of dementia later in life.

Although inflammation, oxidation and acidosis (IOA) are natural and essential for a healthy body, they can be seriously problematic if they become chronic and reoccurring as a result of our body being out of balance. Recent studies have established that the three conditions combined are a leading pathogenic force in the development of chronic diseases—including diabetes, cancers, cardiovascular disease, autoimmune diseases (including asthma and arthritis), osteoporosis, multiple sclerosis, dementia and even depression, obesity and premature ageing.

In modern medicine, we treat the condition that occurs down the line, such as diabetes, by giving the person blood-sugar-lowering drugs. This lowers the blood sugar but does not treat the condition that is causing the diabetic problem. The problem is not high levels of sugar in the blood; it is the damage that has been done, often over decades, by poor diet and lifestyle that have led to chronic inflammation, oxidation and acidosis, the combination of which eventually results in high blood sugar. High blood sugar is just the symptom; the damage is in the cells—in our powerhouse called the mitochondria—and is the result of inflammation, oxidation and acidosis.

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Stop being sick

Stop being sick

The current medical model, which focuses on treating the symptoms with toxic pharmaceuticals, rather than preventing illness, is simply not working. We use more drugs than ever before and we are sicker than ever before. Unfortunately, most of us are very sick by the time we recognise we are ill or decide to do anything about our health. It is never too late, but it is more difficult. By comparison, if you have not serviced your car for 20 years, you don’t expect to repair the damage with one oil change.

The key to treating chronic illness is to act sooner rather than later. As the adage goes, “Prevention is better than cure.” You can, however, take important, health-saving steps at any time.

We need a paradigm shift when it comes to our lifestyle and nutrition. Previously we thought of “nutrition” as the Food Pyramid, 2&5, the RDI (recommended daily intake/allowance) of vitamin C, B vitamins, iron and calcium, counting calories and choosing “low-fat” foods. This approach is outdated and extremely dangerous, and in fact is contributing significantly to the level of chronic illness we have today. We need a lot more nutrition and a great deal more variety—not just the minimum amount to prevent scurvy or beriberi, but the right amounts for optimal health.

In the beginning, there were healthy, whole foods and healthy lifestyles; people took responsibility for their own health. Now most of the world is dying from food-related illness. Half the world is dying from not enough food and the other half from too much nutrient-depleted, calorie-dense, contaminated food. Times have changed and so has the way we need to look at food, nutrition and our health. Chronic illnesses such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease and cancer are now the biggest killers in developed countries with the developing world rapidly catching up. Obesity has overtaken smoking as the single biggest cause of avoidable death in many developed countries.

Understanding some basics of chronic illness is the key to fixing the problem. The simplest place to start is with the underlying conditions that lead to chronic illness. This is what I call the “disease triad” of oxidation, inflammation, and acidosis. The triad, which you will read about in this book, is the underlying cause of all chronic illness in our bodies. The root cause of the illness, however, is what causes these three conditions, which are present in every form of chronic illness and prevent the body from healing and recovering. If we reduce them or even stop them from being out of control, then we can allow our bodies to heal. But the more advanced the chronic illness, the more we have to do in order to slow down and rebalance the triad. By the time modern medicine recognises that you have diabetes, blocked arteries or cancer, you have already had possibly decades of high inflammation, oxidation and acidosis.

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It is inflammation not cholesterol.

It is inflammation not cholesterol.

Here is another nail in the coffin of the cholesterol theory. For the last 40 years the cholesterol theory (yes theory) has continued to change to suit the growing evidence against it. In science if a theory is disproved it is tossed out. Not this one. It keeps being reborn and of course you are now told it is the oxidized LDL cholesterol. And it is. But the problem is not the cholesterol it is the oxidation which leads to inflammation. Stop the oxidation and stop the inflammation.

The study—which monitored more than 10,000 heart patients—was inspired by the observation that around half of the people who suffer a heart attack have normal cholesterol levels and that lowering cholesterol has no significant reduction in mortality. The study showed that reducing inflammation without affecting lipid (cholesterol) levels reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease.

In the study they used a drug, canakinumab, involving 10,061 patients with previous heart attack (myocardial infarction) and a high-sensitivity C-reactive protein- inflammation. At a follow-up of 3.7 years, the incidence rate for heart attacks was 4.50 percent in the placebo group, 4.11 and about 3.90 percent for the higher dose groups. In medicine this is seen as breakthrough and a 16% reduction. The need for by-pass surgery and angioplasty was also reduced by 30 per cent. Cholesterol-lowering statins have a far lower success rate.

However, Canakinumab was associated with a higher incidence of fatal infection than was placebo, that is one in every 1,000 participants suffered a fatal infection. In other words, 10 people died as a direct result of taking the drug. There was no significant difference in all-cause mortality (canakinumab vs. placebo). The cost of the drug treatment is estimated to be more than $65000 US a year.

Despite the results the take-home message is that it is not cholesterol it is inflammation, cholesterol, is associated with CVD but not the cause. The real take home message is that inflammation is best controlled through diet and lifestyle.

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Probiotics to lower inflammation

Probiotics to lower inflammation

Probiotics

Numerous studies have now shown the benefits of probiotics and prebiotics in reducing inflammation and oxidation. A recent meta-analysis indicated a significant reduction in serum CRP following probiotics.[1] Studies suggest the consumption of probiotic yogurt containing L. acidophilus and Bifidobacterium animalis in pregnant women for nine weeks led to a reduction in inflammation (CRP) as it did for colorectal cancer,[2] autoimmune disease,[3] and chronic kidney disease.[4] A number of studies have shown that prebiotics can benefit the elderly who suffer from chronic inflammation by improving their gut microbiota and immune function, ultimately reducing inflammation and oxidation. An 8 g daily prebiotic mixture given for three weeks to elderly subjects reduced inflammation (IL-6) improved T cell counts –immune function.[5]

The anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties of probiotics are thought to act by reducing gut inflammation.[6] Good gut bacteria produce short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) following the fermentation of soluble fibre by gut bacteria like butyrate, propionate and acetate, which are anti-inflammatory.[7] The probiotics, Lactobacillus plantarum, isolated from Chinese traditional Tibetan kefir grains, had strong reducing capacities, lipid peroxidation inhibition capacities, iron-chelating abilities, various free radical scavenging capacities and potent antioxidant activity.[8]

 

[1] Mazidi et al. Nutrients 2017.

[2] Anderson et al. 2004.

[3] Shoaei et al. 2015.

[4] Mazid et al. 2016.

[5] Guigoz et al. 2002.

[6] Alipour et al. 2014.

[7] Tedelind et al. 2007.

[8] Tang et al. 2017.

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Nuts for weight loss

Nuts for weight loss

Despite the large amount of calories and fat in nuts they are an exceptional food for weight loss. You have already heard me tell you to stop counting calories and worrying about fat. Well here is the best example. Nuts are full of nutrients, including healthy fats, and rate at the top of the list for satiety. A number of studies have found that snacking on nuts helps you stay satiated throughout the day and eat less at meals. Nuts are a great source of protein, essential fats, vitamins and minerals. The fats found in nuts promote efficiency in the utilization of proteins and carbohydrates, as well as aiding in absorption of fat-soluble vitamins. Seeds, like nuts, are nutrient-dense and rich in fibre, a major source of prebiotics to feed the good gut bacteria.

In fact, the consumption of some fats, in particular medium chain triglycerides (found in coconut), has been shown to speed up weight loss. Despite the high fat content in nuts and some fruits like avocados, they don’t contribute to weight gain. In fact studies are now showing, those who consume more nuts are the ones who do not put on weight compared to the low nut consumption groups. This is probably due to eating fewer junk food snacks and the benefits of the nutrients on the body’s metabolism. Raw nuts with no added sugar, salt, oil or any other.

And they are good for you.

For more information on real weight loss based on science and my proven program over 20 years go to

https://www.drdingle.com/collections/frontpage/products/unlock-your-genes-for-weight-loss

Here are some references

  1. Abazarfard Z, Salehi M, Keshavarzi S. The effect of almonds on anthropometric measurements and lipid profile in overweight and obese females in a weight reduction program: a randomized controlled clinical trial. J Res Med Sci. 2014;19:457–64.PubMedPubMed CentralGoogle Scholar
  2. Afshin A, Micha R, Khatibzadeh S, Mozaffarian D. Consumption of nuts and legumes and risk of incident ischemic heart disease, stroke, and diabetes: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Am J Clin Nutr. 2014;100:278–88.View ArticlePubMedPubMed CentralGoogle Scholar
  3. Bao Y, Han J, Hu FB, Giovannucci EL, Stampfer MJ, Willett WC, et al. Association of nut consumption with total and cause-specific mortality. N Engl J Med. 2013;369:2001–11.View ArticlePubMedPubMed CentralGoogle Scholar
  4. Bes-Rastrollo M, Wedick NM, Martinez-Gonzalez MA, et al. Prospective study of nut consumption, long-term weight change, and obesity risk in women. Am J Clin Nutr. 2009;89:1913–9.View ArticlePubMedPubMed CentralGoogle Scholar
  5. Brennan AM, Sweeney LL, Liu X, Mantzoros CS. Walnut consumption increases satiation but has no effect on insulin resistance or the metabolic profile over a 4-day period. Obesity. 2010;18:1176–82.View ArticlePubMedGoogle Scholar
  6. Del Gobbo LC, Falk MC, Feldman R, et al. Effects of tree nuts on blood lipids, apolipoproteins, and blood pressure: systematic review, meta-analysis, and dose-response of 61 controlled intervention trials. Am J Clin Nutr. 2015;102:1347–56.View ArticlePubMedPubMed CentralGoogle Scholar
  7. Foster GD, Shantz KL, Vander Veur SS, et al. A randomized trial of the effects of an almond-enriched, hypocaloric diet in the treatment of obesity. Am J Clin Nutr. 2012;96:249–54.View ArticlePubMedPubMed CentralGoogle Scholar
  8. Freisling H, Noh H, Slimani N, et al. Nut intake and 5-year changes in body weight and obesity risk in adults: results from the EPIC-PANACEA study. Eur J Nutr. 2017; doi: 1007/s00394-017-1513-0.
  9. Haddad EH, Gaban-Chong N, Oda K, et al. Effect of a walnut meal on postprandial oxidative stress and antioxidants in healthy individuals. Nutr J. 2014;13:4.View ArticlePubMedPubMed CentralGoogle Scholar
  10. Hu FB, Stampfer MJ, Manson JE, Rimm EB, Colditz GA, Rosner BA, et al. Frequent nut consumption and risk of coronary heart disease in women: prospective cohort study. BMJ. 1998;317(7169):1341–5.View ArticlePubMedPubMed CentralGoogle Scholar
  11. Li Z, Song R, Nguyen C, et al. Pistachio nuts reduce triglycerides and body weight by comparison to refined carbohydrate snack in obese subjects on a 12-week weight loss program. J Am Coll Nutr. 2010;29:198–203.View ArticlePubMedGoogle Scholar
  12. Mattes RD, Dreher ML. Nuts and healthy body weight maintenance mechanisms. Asia Pac J Clin Nutr. 2010;19:137–41.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  13. Mattes RD, Kris-Etherton PM, Foster GD. Impact of peanuts and tree nuts on body weight and healthy weight loss in adults. J Nutr. 2008;138:1741S–5S.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  14. Mohammadifard N, Salehi-Abargouei A, Salas-Salvado J, et al. The effect of tree nut, peanut, and soy nut consumption on blood pressure: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled clinical trials. Am J Clin Nutr. 2015;101:966–82.View ArticlePubMedGoogle Scholar
  15. Natoli S, McCoy P. A review of the evidence: nuts and body weight. Asia Pac J Clin Nutr. 2007;16:588–97.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  16. Neale EP, Tapsell LC, Martin A, et al. Impact of providing walnut samples in a lifestyle intervention for weight loss: a secondary analysis of the HealthTrack trial. Food Nutr Res. 2017;61 doi: 1080/16546628.2017.1344522.
  17. Rock CL, Flatt SW, Barkai HS, et al. A walnut-containing meal had similar effects on early satiety,
  18. Wien MA, Sabate JM, Ikle DN, et al. Almonds vs complex carbohydrates in a weight reduction program. Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 2003;27:1365–72.View ArticlePubMedGoogle Scholar
Read more →

Nuts for weight loss

Nuts for weight loss

Despite the large amount of calories and fat in nuts they are an exceptional food for weight loss. You have already heard me tell you to stop counting calories and worrying about fat. Well here is the best example. Nuts are full of nutrients, including healthy fats, and rate at the top of the list for satiety. A number of studies have found that snacking on nuts helps you stay satiated throughout the day and eat less at meals. Nuts are a great source of protein, essential fats, vitamins and minerals. The fats found in nuts promote efficiency in the utilization of proteins and carbohydrates, as well as aiding in absorption of fat-soluble vitamins. Seeds, like nuts, are nutrient-dense and rich in fibre, a major source of prebiotics to feed the good gut bacteria.

In fact, the consumption of some fats, in particular medium chain triglycerides (found in coconut), has been shown to speed up weight loss. Despite the high fat content in nuts and some fruits like avocados, they don’t contribute to weight gain. In fact studies are now showing, those who consume more nuts are the ones who do not put on weight compared to the low nut consumption groups. This is probably due to eating fewer junk food snacks and the benefits of the nutrients on the body’s metabolism. Raw nuts with no added sugar, salt, oil or any other.

And they are good for you.

For more information on real weight loss based on science and my proven program over 20 years go to

https://www.drdingle.com/collections/frontpage/products/unlock-your-genes-for-weight-loss

Here are some references

  1. Abazarfard Z, Salehi M, Keshavarzi S. The effect of almonds on anthropometric measurements and lipid profile in overweight and obese females in a weight reduction program: a randomized controlled clinical trial. J Res Med Sci. 2014;19:457–64.PubMedPubMed CentralGoogle Scholar
  2. Afshin A, Micha R, Khatibzadeh S, Mozaffarian D. Consumption of nuts and legumes and risk of incident ischemic heart disease, stroke, and diabetes: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Am J Clin Nutr. 2014;100:278–88.View ArticlePubMedPubMed CentralGoogle Scholar
  3. Bao Y, Han J, Hu FB, Giovannucci EL, Stampfer MJ, Willett WC, et al. Association of nut consumption with total and cause-specific mortality. N Engl J Med. 2013;369:2001–11.View ArticlePubMedPubMed CentralGoogle Scholar
  4. Bes-Rastrollo M, Wedick NM, Martinez-Gonzalez MA, et al. Prospective study of nut consumption, long-term weight change, and obesity risk in women. Am J Clin Nutr. 2009;89:1913–9.View ArticlePubMedPubMed CentralGoogle Scholar
  5. Brennan AM, Sweeney LL, Liu X, Mantzoros CS. Walnut consumption increases satiation but has no effect on insulin resistance or the metabolic profile over a 4-day period. Obesity. 2010;18:1176–82.View ArticlePubMedGoogle Scholar
  6. Del Gobbo LC, Falk MC, Feldman R, et al. Effects of tree nuts on blood lipids, apolipoproteins, and blood pressure: systematic review, meta-analysis, and dose-response of 61 controlled intervention trials. Am J Clin Nutr. 2015;102:1347–56.View ArticlePubMedPubMed CentralGoogle Scholar
  7. Foster GD, Shantz KL, Vander Veur SS, et al. A randomized trial of the effects of an almond-enriched, hypocaloric diet in the treatment of obesity. Am J Clin Nutr. 2012;96:249–54.View ArticlePubMedPubMed CentralGoogle Scholar
  8. Freisling H, Noh H, Slimani N, et al. Nut intake and 5-year changes in body weight and obesity risk in adults: results from the EPIC-PANACEA study. Eur J Nutr. 2017; doi: 1007/s00394-017-1513-0.
  9. Haddad EH, Gaban-Chong N, Oda K, et al. Effect of a walnut meal on postprandial oxidative stress and antioxidants in healthy individuals. Nutr J. 2014;13:4.View ArticlePubMedPubMed CentralGoogle Scholar
  10. Hu FB, Stampfer MJ, Manson JE, Rimm EB, Colditz GA, Rosner BA, et al. Frequent nut consumption and risk of coronary heart disease in women: prospective cohort study. BMJ. 1998;317(7169):1341–5.View ArticlePubMedPubMed CentralGoogle Scholar
  11. Li Z, Song R, Nguyen C, et al. Pistachio nuts reduce triglycerides and body weight by comparison to refined carbohydrate snack in obese subjects on a 12-week weight loss program. J Am Coll Nutr. 2010;29:198–203.View ArticlePubMedGoogle Scholar
  12. Mattes RD, Dreher ML. Nuts and healthy body weight maintenance mechanisms. Asia Pac J Clin Nutr. 2010;19:137–41.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  13. Mattes RD, Kris-Etherton PM, Foster GD. Impact of peanuts and tree nuts on body weight and healthy weight loss in adults. J Nutr. 2008;138:1741S–5S.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  14. Mohammadifard N, Salehi-Abargouei A, Salas-Salvado J, et al. The effect of tree nut, peanut, and soy nut consumption on blood pressure: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled clinical trials. Am J Clin Nutr. 2015;101:966–82.View ArticlePubMedGoogle Scholar
  15. Natoli S, McCoy P. A review of the evidence: nuts and body weight. Asia Pac J Clin Nutr. 2007;16:588–97.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  16. Neale EP, Tapsell LC, Martin A, et al. Impact of providing walnut samples in a lifestyle intervention for weight loss: a secondary analysis of the HealthTrack trial. Food Nutr Res. 2017;61 doi: 1080/16546628.2017.1344522.
  17. Rock CL, Flatt SW, Barkai HS, et al. A walnut-containing meal had similar effects on early satiety,
  18. Wien MA, Sabate JM, Ikle DN, et al. Almonds vs complex carbohydrates in a weight reduction program. Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 2003;27:1365–72.View ArticlePubMedGoogle Scholar
Read more →

Dr Peter Dingle’s South West WA Wellness Tour

Dr Peter Dingle’s South West WA Wellness Tour

Hope you can make it to one of our talks

Toxic Overload

October 16, 7.00 pm

Harvey

http://tix.yt/toxicoverloadharvey

 

Toxic Overload

October 17, 7.00 pm

Dalyellup

http://tix.yt/toxicoverloaddalyellup

 

Your Gut Health, Microbiome and Probiotics

October 18 2017

Bunbury turf club

Blair Street Bunbury 6230 Australia

7.00-9.00 PM each night

http://tix.yt/gutmicrobiomeprobioticsbunbury

 

7 Steps To Permanent Weight Loss 

October 19 2017

Bunbury turf club

Blair Street Bunbury 6230 Australia

7.00-9.00 PM each night

http://tix.yt/weightlossbunbury

 

Toxic Overload

October 20, 9.30 am

Leshenault

http://tix.yt/toxicoverloadleshanaultam

 

Toxic Overload

October 20, 7.00 pm

Leshenault

http://tix.yt/toxicoverloadleshanaultpm

 

 

Toxic Overload

October 23, 7.00-9.00 pm

Dunsborough

http://tix.yt/toxicoverloaddunsborougham

 

 

Toxic Overload

October 24, 9.30 -11.30 am

Dunsborough

http://tix.yt/toxicoverloaddunsboroughpm

 

 

Your Gut Health, Microbiome and Probiotics

October 24, 2017

Dunsborough

St George Community Care 48 Gibney Street

 http://tix.yt/gut-healthprobioticsdunsborough

 

Albany

Dog Rock Motel seminar room

303 Middleton Road Mount Clarence 6330

7.00-9.00 PM each night

 

October 26, 2017

Your Gut Health, Microbiome and Probiotics

http://tix.yt/gutmicrobiomeprobioticsalbany

 

October 27 2017

Dangerous Beauty. The toxic truth about cosmetics and personal care products

http://tix.yt/dangerousbeautyalbany

 

October 28 2017

The 7 steps to permanent weight loss

http://tix.yt/weightlossalbany

 

Toxic Overload

We are now surrounded by long list of modern day toxic chemicals in our homes and the personal care products that are impacting on our health.  These poisons and potions are playing their role in making us sick and are linked with the increase in disease like breast cancer, hormone imbalances, thyroid problems and even infertility. Even at “so called” normal levels these chemicals contribute to diseases such as fatigue, depression, stress and anxiety and are linked with diabetes, cardio vascular disease, cancer, estrogen and hormone havoc and weight gain.

This presentation will change your attitudes to many things around you and your home, how you clean and what you put on your skin and empower you to make some simple changes to improve your health. We’ll show you that with a few simple modifications you can easily improve the health status of your home, your wellbeing and that of your family.

 

Gut Health, Microbiome and Probiotics.

Probiotics and a healthy microbiome in our digestive tract is now recognised as one of the most critical conditions for our health and wellbeing. While it is obvious when it comes to many digestive disorders recent research has shown it can be involved in virtually every form of chronic illness. A study in 2016 for example confirmed that up to 50% of Parkinson’s disease can be related to an unhealthy gut microbiome. While many skin conditions like eczema, psoriasis and even acne as well as Alzheimer’s, MS, allergies, diabetes type 1 and 2 and high blood pressure are all related to a healthy gut. Even weight gain and weight loss is influenced by your gut microbiome. Both directly and indirectly a healthy gut can determine how healthy you are and even how much weight you put on. However, a healthy gut is determined by many more factors than just supplementing with probiotics or eating yoghurt.

In this one night presentation you will learn about the importance of gut health as well as what steps you can take to improve. This night is a must to see.

 

7 Steps To Permanent Weight Loss 

Diets, counting calories and low fat foods don’t work because they are working against your genes. These diets are going against millions of years of evolution. Studies on these types of diets show impaired mental performance, poor immediate memory and slower reaction times, they lose more muscle and develop metabolic and immune system disorders. Even more disturbing people on these diets lose muscle, end up putting on more weight and die younger.

The reason is that these Diets focus on the wrong thing. They ignore the genetic, biochemical and nutritional needs of your body so they can never succeed.

Learn the secrets of weight loss and the language of talking to your genes. Learn to retune your genes to lose extra kilos of weight without dieting.

Dr Dingle will show you by focusing on nutrient dense foods, supplementation, the right protein foods, probiotics and eliminating toxins you can unlock your genes for weight loss and wellbeing without dieting and exercise.

 

Dangerous Beauty. The toxic truth about cosmetics and personal care products

(Albany Only)

The personal care and cosmetic products you use directly influence the health of your family. These products impact their hormone levels and thyroid function and are linked with weight gain. These chemicals are linked with Estrogen overload and hormone imbalances, Breast and prostate cancer, Thyroid dysfunction and hypothyroidism, Impaired immune system, Skin ageing, infertility and testosterone in males and so much more.

Most Personal care products contain parabens, phthalates, solvents, mineral oils and other hormone disrupting chemicals and you won’t even know it because they may be a “secret ingredient” or even formaldehyde hidden under another name.

We now know that many of these toxic chemicals pass through the skin and into the blood where they can accumulate and cause damage and can pass into the placenta and accumulate in breast tissue.

Every application increases the risk and exposure and of greatest concern is that it is young women and girls who are most exposed to these toxins. But no one is exempt. Even girls of 5 and 6 are showing up with high concentrations of these toxins.

The good news is that by learning a little bit and avoiding these chemicals and making a few simple changes to your lives you can make a big difference to the health of your family. Your choices today have the power to affect fertility, breast cancer and weight gain even for the next few generations.

At this presentation you will find out what you can do to protect your family health, what to avoid and what is ok.

Dr Peter Dingle PhD

Exploding old belief systems, Dr Dingle dispels myths and confusion around health and how to create long lasting wellbeing. He puts the real facts at your fingertips, then provides you with personalised options to ensure your choices get you the best out of your future.

Nobody knows wellness like Dr Peter Dingle, Australia’s most engaging and innovative thought leader on the topics of health, wellness and weight loss who presents cutting-edge science in a bold, courageous, humourous and straight-shooting manner.

Dr Dingle is Australia's most popular and qualified professional speaker. He holds 2 Degrees in Science and a PhD, 21 years as an academic at Murdoch University and written 15 books on health and wellness.

Dr Dingle has a unique ability to entertain, educate and involve simultaneously. A natural entertainer, Dr D transports delighted audiences on a journey of truth and laughter that will empower them to optimize energy and health, find better life balance and their health

Dr Peter Dingle is known both in Australia and around the world as one of the most impactful and engaging thought leaders in the Health and Wellness Movement.  Over the last 30 Years he has helped hundreds of thousands of people better their lives by cutting through medical and health myths to give the real facts on evidence-based wellness.

 

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