Dr Dingle's Blog / medical myths

Probiotics can reduce pain

Probiotics can reduce pain

Treatments for obesity have been shown to reduce pain secondary to weight loss. Intestinal microbiota has been shown to influence obesity and pain sensitivity.
Physiological pain plays a life-essential protective role, while acute or chronic pathological pain indicates a medical problem that needs treatment and imposes a medical challenge. Neurotransmitters, immune cells, and hormones have been demonstrated to contribute in pathogenesis of chronic pain.
Pain threshold is influenced by several factors, including obesity, which alters adipose tissue metabolic and endocrine functions leading to alterations in systemic physiology including an increased release of fatty acids, hormones, and proinflammatory molecules that contribute to obesity associated complications. Studies have demonstrated that obese humans and rats are more sensitive to pain stimuli than normal weighted ones.
Previous studies have demonstrated a relationship between intestinal microbiota and diseases including pain disorders with probiotics having a positive effect.
In this study the mice taking probiotics had a significantly lower sensitivity to mechanical stimulation compared to their corresponding control. The results of this study suggest a protective effect of probiotics on nociception circuits, which propose a direct result of the weight reduction or an indirect result of anti-inflammatory properties of the probiotics.

source

Potential Nociceptive Regulatory Effect of Probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus PB01 (DSM 14870) on Mechanical Sensitivity in Diet-Induced Obesity Model

https://www.hindawi.com/journals/prm/2016/5080438/

 

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Fasting reverses Type 2 diabetes

Fasting reverses Type 2 diabetes

Despite what we are often told the overwhelming evidence shows that Type 2 diabetes is a diet and lifestyle illness. It also shows that when you reverse the conditions that caused it the disease is also reversible.

Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a chronic disease closely linked to the epidemic of obesity that requires long-term medical attention to limit the development of its wide range of complications. Many of these complications arise from the combination of resistance to insulin action, inadequate insulin secretion, and excessive or inappropriate glucagon secretion. Approximately 10% of the population of the USA and Canada have a diagnosis of T2D, and the morbidity and mortality rates associated with it are fairly high. The economic burden of T2D in the USA is $245 billion and around $20 billion in Australia.

This case documents three patients referred to the Intensive Dietary Management clinic in Toronto, Canada, for insulin-dependent type 2 diabetes. It demonstrates the effectiveness of therapeutic fasting to reverse their insulin resistance, resulting in cessation of insulin therapy while maintaining control of their blood sugars. In addition, these patients were also able to lose significant amounts of body weight, reduce their waist circumference and also reduce their glycated haemoglobin level.

These three cases exemplify that therapeutic fasting may reduce insulin requirements in T2D. Given the rising cost of insulin, patients may potentially save significant money. Further, the reduced need for syringes and blood glucose monitoring may reduce patient discomfort.

Therapeutic fasting has the potential to fill this gap in diabetes care by providing similar intensive caloric restriction and hormonal benefits as bariatric surgery without the invasive and dangerous surgery. During fasting periods, patients are allowed to drink unlimited amounts of very low-calorie fluids such as water, coffee, tea and bone broth. A general multivitamin supplement is encouraged to provide adequate micronutrients. Precise fasting schedules vary depending primarily on the patient’s preference, ranging from 16 hours to several days. On eating days, patients are encouraged to eat a diet low in sugar and refined carbohydrates, which decreases blood glucose and insulin secretion.

This means that patients with T2D can reverse their diseases without the worry of side effects and financial burden of many pharmaceuticals, as well as the unknown long-term risks and uncertainty of surgery, all by means of therapeutic fasting.

 

Source http://casereports.bmj.com/content/2018/bcr-2017-221854.full

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Antibiotics and “The War on Bacteria”

Antibiotics and “The War on Bacteria”

While antibiotics have been lifesaving, the over-prescription of antibiotics has sparked the evolution of drug-resistant strains of life threatening bacteria, resulting in tens of thousands of deaths each year.[1] The US Centers for Disease Control estimate that up to 50% of antibiotics prescribed in the US are unnecessary.[2] Unfortunately, the use of antibiotics is often prescribed for those groups who are more vulnerable to dysbiosis, including infants born via C-section[3] and in those born preterm, compared to term infants born vaginally,[4] potentially compounding the problems. Micro-organisms such as bacteria, fungi, viruses, and parasites cause many of the world’s diseases, yet only bacterial infections are usually susceptible to treatment with commonly prescribed antibiotics.

However, more subtle side effects of antibiotics on the gut microbiome are only just beginning to be discovered. Broad-spectrum antibiotics can impact up to 30% of the bacteria among the human microbiota, resulting in severe loss of species and function[5] and begins immediately following antibiotic administration. The effects can sometimes last for years after its cessation,[6] and may also lead to the total extinction of some beneficial microbial species. As few as three days of treatment with the most commonly prescribed antibiotics can result in sustained reductions in microbiota diversity.[7] A typical two-week course of high-dose antibiotic treatment, as might be used for an ear infection, can wipe out most of the beneficial gut microbes.

These antibiotic-induced changes in the microbiota have been linked to many disease states including increased infections, metabolic disturbances, obesity, autoimmunity,[8] and mental health conditions. Common outcomes of antibiotics the antibiotic-disturbed gut microbiota are diarrhea and infections with Clostridium difficile,[9] particularly in infants.[10]

Early life exposure to antibiotics presents the greatest risk of long-term damage to the gut microbiota and the more you take, the worse it is.[11] In young children, antibiotics may change the development of the “adult” microbiota, and not allow its normal maturation.[12] It has also been hypothesized to cause a delay in microbial maturation from six to 12 months after birth.[13] Early life exposure is also associated with numerous diseases later in life including IBD,[14] obesity,[15] and asthma, as well as the development of immune-mediated[16] metabolic and neurological diseases.[17]

In a meta-analysis of eight studies including 12,082 subjects, antibiotic use in the first year of life was significantly associated with two-fold (200%) increased chance of the child having asthma.[18] One study reported the use of antibiotics in newborns increased the risk of developing asthma by 24 times. Probiotics during the neonatal period were protective and reduced the risk by as much as 86% for childhood asthma for kids at risk.[19] Studies of mice treated with antibiotics in early life revealed altered microbial populations within the gut microbiota and consequently increased the susceptibility of these mice to asthma.[20]

Antibiotic use has also been shown to have long-term effects on brain neurochemistry and behavior. Such use is known to alter the intestinal microbiome with subsequent changes in microbiota to gut-brain axis[21] and result in poorer neuro-cognitive outcomes later in life.[22]

Even treatment with a single antibiotic course was associated with a 25% higher risk for depression and the risk increased with recurrent antibiotic exposures to 40% for two to five courses and 56% for more than five courses of antibiotics. The higher the rates of antibiotic use, the higher the rates of depression.[23] Animal studies have shown that high doses of a cocktail of antibiotics induced lasting changes in gut microbiota associated with behavioural alterations.[24]

Animal studies of early life exposure to antibiotics show lasting immune and metabolic consequences.[25] Administration of low doses of penicillin to mice early in life increases the risk of weight gain and obesity and promotes lipid accumulation by altering the gut microbiota.[26] Mice treated continuously with low-dose penicillin from one week before birth until weaning exhibited higher body weight and fat mass in adulthood, although the microbial structure returned to normal after four weeks of antibiotics cessation.[27] There is also evidence of antibiotics playing a role in the development of IBD in children[28] and that antibiotic usage during the first year of life was more common in those diagnosed with IBD later in life.[29]

Antibiotics and pregnancy

In human studies, mother’s use of antibiotics during pregnancy is consistently associated with cow’s milk allergy,[30] wheeze, asthma,[31] and atopic dermatitis,[32] with the strongest association for antibiotic use in the third trimester of pregnancy.[33] A study of 306 children with asthma showed that mother’s use of antibiotics during pregnancy increased the risk by a whopping four times (390%).[34] Low-dose penicillin in late pregnancy and early postnatal life in the offspring of mice resulted in lasting effects on gut microbiota, increased brain inflammation, and resulted in anxiety-like behaviours and displays of aggression.[35] Similar results have been shown for antibiotic exposure through breastfeeding.[36]

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[1] Fleming-Dutra et al., 2016.

[2] Fleming-Dutra et al., 2016.

[3] Penders et al., 2006.

[4] Forsgren et al., 2017.

[5] Francino, 2016.

[6] Jakobsson et al., 2010.

[7] Shira et al., 2016.

[8] Francino, 2016.

[9] Ng et al., 2013.

[10] Rousseau et al., 2011.

[11] Fouhy et al., 2012; Tanaka et al., 2009.

[12] Bokulich et al., 2016.

[13] Ibid, 2016.

[14] Hviid et al., 2011.

[15] Azad et al., 2014.

[16] Metsälä et al., 2013.

[17] Arrieta et al., 2014.

[18] Marra et al., 2006.

[19] Zhang et al., 2017.

[20] Russell et al., 2012.

[21] Rogers et al., 2016; Tochitani et al., 2016.

[22] Russell et al., 2013.

[23] Lurie et al., 2015.

[24] Bercik, P. et al., 2011; Desbonnet, L. et al., 2015; Fröhlich, E. E. et al., 2016; Wang, T. et al., 2015.

[25] Russell et al., 2013; Cox et al., 2014.

[26] Cox et al., 2014.

[27] Ibid, 2014.

[28] Shaw et al., 2010;  Ortqvist et al., 2017.

[29] Shaw et al., 2010.

[30] Chu et al., 2015.

[31] Stensballe et al., 2013; Kashanian et al., 2017; Mulder et al., 2016; Murk et al., 2011.

[32] Timm et al., 2017.

[33] Zhao et al., 2015; Wang et al., 2017.

[34] Zhang et al., 2017.

[35] Leclercq et al., 2017.

[36] Kummeling et al., 2007.

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Depression caused by inflammation and oxidation. Not a serotonin imbalance

Depression caused by inflammation and oxidation. Not a serotonin imbalance

Depression itself is not a disease, but a symptom of an underlying problem. A new theory called the “Immune Cytokine Model of Depression” holds that depression is a “multifaceted sign of chronic immune system activation,” inflammation. Depression may be a symptom of chronic inflammation. And a large body of research now suggests that depression is associated with a low-grade, chronic inflammatory response and is accompanied by increased oxidative stress—not a serotonin imbalance.

Researchers discovered in the early 1980s that inflammatory cytokines produce a wide variety of psychiatric and neurological symptoms that perfectly mirror the defining characteristics of depression. Cytokines have been shown to access the brain and interact with virtually every mechanism known to be involved in depression[1] including neurotransmitter metabolism, neuroendocrine function, and neural plasticity.

This is now supported by increasing lines of scientific evidence[2] including:

  • Depression is often present in acute, inflammatory illnesses.
  • Higher levels of inflammation increase the risk of developing depression.
  • Administering endotoxins that provoke inflammation in healthy people triggers classic depressive symptoms.
  • One-quarter of patients who take interferon, a medication used to treat hepatitis C that causes significant inflammation, develop major depression.
  • Up to 50% of patients who received the cytokine IFN-alpha therapy to help treat cancer or infectious diseases developed “clinically significant depression.”[3]
  • An experiment involving the administration of a Salmonella typhi vaccine to healthy individuals produced symptoms of fatigue, mental confusion, psychomotor slowing and a depressed mood.[4] These symptoms correlated with the increase in cytokine concentrations.
  • Remission of clinical depression is often associated with a normalization of inflammatory markers.
  • There is now a large body of literature regarding laboratory animals demonstrating that cytokines … can lead to a host of behavioural changes overlapping with those found in depression. These behavioral changes include decreased activity, cognitive dysfunction and altered sleep.[5]
  • All the activities associated with reducing the prevalence of depression and depression symptoms are anti-inflammatory. These include increased sunlight and time spent outside, exercise and physical activity, relaxation and meditation techniques, healthy eating as well as administering anti-inflammatory nutritionals.

There is further support from large epidemiological studies. A number of longitudinal studies have now shown that inflammation in early adulthood predicts depression at a later stage in life. In a large longitudinal study, the risk for depression and psychotic experiences in adolescence was almost two-fold higher in individuals with the highest compared to the lowest levels of inflammation as indicated by interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels in childhood. Children who were in the top third of IL-6 levels at the age of 9 years were 55% more likely to be diagnosed with depression at the age of 18 than those with the lowest childhood levels of IL-6. Children in the highest level of IL-6 levels at the age of 9 were also 81% more likely to report psychotic experiences at the age of 18.[6] A study of more than 73,000 men and women showed increasing inflammation levels were associated with increasing risk for psychological distress and depression. Increasing inflammation (CRP) levels were also associated with increasing risk for hospitalization with depression.[7]

In support of the inflammation depression link, recent studies have found a significant link between the dietary inflammatory index (DII) and risk of depression. In an Australian study of 6,438 middle-aged women, those with the most anti-inflammatory diet had an approximately 26% lower risk of developing depression compared with women with the most pro-inflammatory diet.[8] Similarly, a study in the UK examined the DII and recurrent depressive symptoms over five years in 3,178 middle-aged men and 1,068 women. Researchers found that for each increment of 1 level of DII score (increased inflammation), odds of depression increased by 66% in women, whereas in men the risk increased by only 12%.[9] In a study of 15,093 university graduates in Spain, those on the highest DII (strongly pro-inflammatory diet) had a 47% risk of depression compared with those in the bottom, with a significant dose-response relationship, which means as the diet became more inflammatory it increased the risk of depression. Further analysis also showed the association between DII (the inflammatory diet) and depression was stronger among participants older than 55 years, with an increased risk of 270% and those with cardiometabolic comorbidities (high blood pressure, diabetes, etc.) had an 80% increased risk of depression.[10] In a study of 43,685 women (aged 50–77) without depression at baseline, the risk of developing depression was 41% higher if they were on the highest compared to the lowest Dietary Inflammatory Index diet.[11]

Oxidative stress is closely related to the inflammatory pathway in particular. Pro-inflammatory cytokines are produced in reaction to oxidative stress and oxidative stress in turn amplifies the inflammatory response. High cortisol levels have been associated with increased levels of oxidative damage.[12] Depression has been associated with increased oxidative stress and increased severity of depression is associated with increased systemic oxidatively generated DNA and RNA damage.[13] Severe depression is associated with increased systemic oxidatively generated RNA damage, which may be an additional factor underlying the somatic morbidity and neurodegenerative features associated with depression. In a meta-analysis, 1,308 subjects depressed persons had increased oxidative stress and decreased anti-oxidant defences (as measured by 8-OHdG and F2-isoprostanes).[14] The results indicate that depression is associated with increased oxidative damage to DNA and lipids. The brain is particularly vulnerable to oxidative damage due to its high oxygen consumption and low antioxidant defences. Sustained oxidative brain damage during a depressive episode may make a sufferer prone to developing another depressive episode. Therefore, it has been hypothesized that exposure to oxidative stress could be an explanatory mechanism in the remitting and chronic course of depressive disorders.[15] There is also evidence from post-mortem studies suggesting that in depression oxidative stress is increased[16] and antioxidants are decreased[17] in the brain.

A study of 37 patients with bipolar disorder showed that bipolar disorder is associated with increased oxidatively generated damage to nucleosides, which could be contributing to the increased risk of medical disorders, shortened life expectancy, and the progressive course of illness observed in bipolar disorder.[18] Another study showed increased oxidative stress as indicated by increased nitric oxide (NO) and lipid peroxidation, measured by thiobarbituric acidic reactive substance (TBARS) assay in patients with bipolar disorder.[19]

There is evidence suggesting that antioxidants are decreased in depression, illustrated by lower antioxidant levels,[20] including carotenoids,[21] and antioxidant enzymes.[22] There is some evidence to suggest that antidepressants have antioxidant properties and may act through reducing pro-inflammatory cytokines and ROS production and improving levels of antioxidants such as superoxide dismutase.[23]

 

[1] Miller et al. 2009.

[2] Berk et al. 2011.

[3] Miller 2009.

[4] Brydon et al. 2008.

[5] Dantzer et al. 2008.

[6] JAMA Psychiatry 13, 2014.

[7] Wium-Anderson et al. 2013.

[8] Nitin Shivappa et al. 2016 British Journal of Nutrition.

[9] Akbaraly et al. Clinical Psychological Science 2016.

[10] Sanchez-Villegas A et al. British Journal of Nutrition 2015.

[11] Lucas et al. 2014.

[12] Joergensen et al. 2011.

[13] Jorgensen et al. 2013; Pandya et al. 2013.

[14] Black et al. 2014; Palta et al. 2014.

[15] Moylan et al. 2013.

[16] Wange et al. 2009; Michel et al. 2012.

[17] Gawryluk et al. 2011.

[18] Munkholm et al. 2015.

[19] Andreazza et al. 2008.

[20] Palta et al. 2014.

[21] Milaneschi et al. 2012.

[22] Sarandol et al. 2007.

[23] Khanzode et al. 2003; Lee et al. 2013.

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Study shows Inflammation causes heart disease and how to lower it

Study shows Inflammation causes heart disease and how to lower it

Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD) such as acute heart atacks and stroke remains the leading cause of death worldwide. Both epidemiological and clinical studies have shown a strong link between inflammation, such as C-reactive protein (CRP), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and interleukin (IL)-6, and the risk of cardiovascular events. Studies have also shown a strong link with inflammation and insulin resistance, an important determinant of CVD and diabetes.

So it all comes down to inflammation

In this study they investigated the link between inflammation insulin resistance and fat consumption and found insulin resistance linked with inflammation (hs-CRP and IL-6) and these inflammatory biomarkers were positively associated with saturated fatty acids and negatively associated with unsaturated fatty acids and monounsaturated fats. Dietary components, especially fatty acids, affect the expression and release of inflammatory biomarkers. Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), such as eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), have a cardioprotective effect by reducing inflammation. Indeed, clinical studies have shown that diets may have effect on inflammatory biomarkers.

What does this mean?

One step to lower you inflammation and risk of CVD the major killer in in the world (and all chronic illness if you read my work) is to increase your omega 3 fatty acid and lower some of your saturated fats. There are many other ways to lower your inflammation and risk of chronic disease including lifestyle and dietary changes.

 

source

https://nutritionj.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12937-018-0342-1

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Eating more processed leads to more cancers including breast cancer

Eating more processed leads to more cancers including breast cancer

In the latest study of 104 980 participants every 10% increase in processed food lead to a 12% increase in the risk of overall cancer and an 11% increase for the risk of breast cancer. 18 per cent of the group was regularly eating  highly processed foods.

I see people, particularly young people who eat processed food 3 or more times a day. Junk breakfast cereals like nutrigrain, and take-aways or packet food for dinner and lunch. This is not food. These same people have a myriad of adverse health conditions and wonder why they are sick. Then later they develop cancer and wonder why. No person wants to die of cancer however with the exception of smoking, what we eat has a huge impact on our risk of cancer and of course every other form of chronic illness. This is a choice.

Processed foods often have a higher content of processed and saturated fat, added sugar and salt, along with a lower fibre and low nutrient density, with low vitamin, minerals and plant based nutrients. They contribute to inflammation, oxidation and acidosis which what feeds cancers and other chronic illness (see my book “Overcoming illness”).

In addition it has newly created carcinogenic contaminants such as acrylamide, heterocyclic amines, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons as a result of heat treating the food.  Packaged processed foods might also contain contaminants from the wrapping including phthalates and bisphenol A or food additives sodium nitrite in processed meat, titanium dioxide (TiO2, white food pigment) or emulsifiers now linked with gut illness and thought to cause cancer.

I have written extensively on all of this in my latest book “Overcoming illness”

Source

http://www.bmj.com/content/360/bmj.k322

https://www.drdingle.com/collections/frontpage/products/overcoming-illness-pre-order

 

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Inflammation food and cardio vascular disease.

Inflammation food and cardio vascular disease.

All chronic illness including cancers, osteoporosis, cardiovascular disease and renal disease and more are linked through inflammation which is described in my latest book "Overcoming Illness". Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is one of the most common causes of morbidity and mortality in different communities accounting for more than 31% or 17.5 million deaths worldwide.

In this study of 454 patients aged 35-80 years a high dietary inflammatory Index (DII- higher inflammation producing in the foods they eat) scores were associated with higher age, higher prevalence of diabetes and myocardial infarction (MI- heart attack) and lower educational attainment. Male patients in top half of DII had significantly higher total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG), albumin, creatinine, BUN and hs-CRP concentrations and lower high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL) concentrations compared with male patients in lower half. While in female patients, only lipoprotein (a) concentrations and hematocrit (HCT) percentage in the 4th and 2nd quartile were significantly higher than lower quartiles.

The results clearly show a positive association with the inflammation level in foods and several cardiovascular risk factors. The higher inflammatory potential of diet denoted higher values of serum lipids, CRP and kidney function tests.

Current evidence supports that inflammation is a major driving force in patients with coronary artery disease, underlying the initiation of coronary plaques, their unstable progression, and eventual disruption. The pro-inflammatory nature of the cardiovascular disease can be explained by this fact that almost in all of the atherosclerosis processes inflammatory molecules are involved

Diet and dietary habits play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease and dietary habits are potential determinants of the disease severity. The role of dietary factors and nutritional regimens in the prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and its progression has been extensively studied; numerous reports suggested the role of healthy dietary choices and improved life style with higher physical activity level and higher intakes of healthy foods including fruits and vegetables and dietary antioxidants in prevention and treatment of cardiovascular event.

 

Source

https://nutritionj.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12937-018-0325-2

Overcoming Illness is the book that explains all about inflammation and oxidation, their link with chronic illness and how to lower inflammation to improve your health and overcome illness.

https://www.drdingle.com/collections/frontpage/products/overcoming-illness-pre-order

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Understanding weight gain

Understanding weight gain

Weight gain is not just a fluke; it is a symptom of Western diet and lifestyle—our thoughts and actions being out of balance with our genetics and evolution. As incredible as this may sound, the ability to modify behaviour of your genes to influence weight loss is a key concept in this book. Epigenetics is the scientific field that looks at how genes interact with our diet, environment, lifestyle and even emotions, to change the expression of our genes for better or worse—and in the case of weight gain, for worse.

In a very real sense, everything that happens in our bodies ultimately takes place on a genetic level. Nothing happens without the genes being involved, either directly or indirectly. And the way our genes are programmed is largely a product of our environment and our evolution. A large body of research clearly shows that good health, abundant energy and weight management all rely on the normal functioning of genes which, in turn, depends on a healthy environment, diet and lifestyle. The research also shows that you can improve your weight and health, regardless of the genes with which you are born. You are not stuck with genes that make you gain weight.

Many of today’s health problems result from what amounts to a collision between ancient genetics and modern, highly processed foods. Our genes are routinely exposed to genetically unfamiliar foods and chemicals, and they respond abnormally, such as by triggering inflammation, chronic illness, low energy and weight gain. We evolved in a rich environment full of nutrient-dense foods and only the stress of the hunt—a very different scenario than our lives today. In times past, every calorie consumed came with large amounts of vitamins, minerals, proteins and healthy fats, relatively little starch and almost no grain. Many ancient diets were extraordinarily diverse, including up to a hundred different types of plant foods, as well as scores of land animals, many species of fish and wild bird eggs.

Today, we are living out of balance, and paying the price. It doesn’t take much to put on extra weight. Even small disturbances in energy balance may lead to the onset of obesity.

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Paleo diet good for weight loss in older women

Paleo diet good for weight loss in older women

The weight loss, low calorie, low fat don't eat anything nice diets have never worked for weight loss. In fact they can boomerang and cause muscle loss and weight gain. Postmenopausal women have an increased risk of obesity, for instance due to the reduction of oestrogen production in combination with an elevated energy intake and reduced physical activity.

The Paleo diet allows people to eat plenty of unsaturated fats and low-glycaemic carbohydrates—the ones that are lower in sugar—and specifically focuses on vegetables, lean meats, fish, poultry, eggs, shellfish, seeds, nuts and fruits, and excludes all grains and cereals, milk, refined sugars and added salt.

In this study of 70 overweight post-menopausal were either put on the Paleo diet or the Nordic Nutrition Recommendations diet, which is like the Paleo but allows cereals and grains, milk, refined sugars and added salt.Over the two years, women on the Paleo diet lost an average of nine kilos (20 lbs) while those following the Nordic diet lost an average of six kilos (13 lbs). But the biggest difference was the overall health of the Paleo-group women. They saw levels of risk factors of type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular diseases and enzymes involved in fat storage decrease. The weight loss in both dietary groups also contributed to reduced inflammation in both fat tissue and in the circulation which is the major cause of chronic illness. (https://www.drdingle.com/collections/frontpage/products/overcoming-illness-pre-order)

The good news is the women had "free reign" about the amount of food they could eat as long as it followed the guidelines.


“In conclusion, the study shows that the Paleolithic diet with a high

proportion of unsaturated fats was healthier for this group of women, even if the Nordic Nutrition Recommendations also had positive health effects,” says Caroline Blomquist.

Source. http://www.medfak.umu.se/english/about-the-faculty/news/newsdetailpage/paleolithic-diet-healthier-for-overweight-women.cid289548

Our next "7 steps to Permanent Weight Loss" is on Tuesday February 27 in North Perth. http://tix.yt/permanentweightloss

 

Learn

Why diets or exercise programs don't work

The role of hormones

7 simple steps to weight loss.

Which foods work best

The importance of...

But it is much more than the paleo

 

 

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An apple a day to lower inflammation beats statin drugs.

An apple a day to lower inflammation beats statin drugs.

I have been researching and writing on cholesterol and statin drugs for more than 10 years and millions of people still take them. Cholesterol is not the killer it is inflammation, oxidation and acidosis. No one has ever died from cholesterol. It is associated with CVD but not the cause. So if you lower cholesterol you do not lower the risk of CVD more than 1%.

The statin drugs are at best ineffective but in reality are dangerous. The real cause of heart attacks and strokes, Cardiovascular disease is inflammation and oxidation. If you want to lower your risk of these conditions lower your inflammation, oxidation and acidosis.

In support of this a recent study out of Oxford University showed that one apple a day out performs the statin drugs without the side effects of diabetes, muscle disease, dementia and other serous side effects.

Using mathematical modelling, the researchers say that eating an apple a day could prevent 8,500 deaths from heart disease every year if 70 per cent of the total population of over-50s ate one, compared to 9,400 saved lives if everyone took a statin.

Source: BMJ, 2013; 347: f7267. A statin a day keeps the doctor away: comparative proverb assessment modelling study. BMJ 2013; 347 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.f7267

While another study in the Journal of Functional Foods back in 2012 found the consumption of just one apple/day for 4 weeks drastically lowered plasma concentrations of oxidized low-density lipoprotein and showed that an easily accomplished dietary intervention had a major effect on an atherosclerosis risk factor, in part via polyphenols. (http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jff.2012.08.010)

Unlike stain drugs apples are full of nutrients that lower inflammation and your risk of all forms of chronic illness.

Apples are rich in polyphenols, which provide antioxidant  and anti inflammatory properties and modulation of gut microbiota.

Cholesterol is not the killer it is inflammation.

For information on inflammation and how to lower it

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