Dr Dingle's Blog / healthy food

Controlling candida

Controlling candida

Candida has a high degree of resistance to many available drugs. In the case of candida it is not just candia on its own but the potential associations it has with other opportunistic species and how they work together to protect each other with a resilient biofilm. The most important feature of biofilm growth is the high resistance to antimicrobial agents. To deal with this the best options are to use multiple strategies.

The best approach is to eat more of the functional foods, herbs and spices on a daily basis which help rebalance the gut microbiome and eliminate the opportunistic specises like Candida. Aloe vera in both its crude and extract form has been shown to have positive antimicrobial effects especially against Candida species. Aloe has also been shown to be effective against some pathogenic specis including Salmonella gallinarum. One study investigated the effect of Aloe when consumed orally in patient suffering from an inflammatory bowels disease given at the rate of two ounces three times daily for a week was able to rebalance the regulating gastrointestinal motility and decrease stool transit leading to curing diarrhea.

Coconut oil and its constituent fatty acids have potent antifungal activity and have been shown to both inhibit the growth of and kill C. albicans in vitro (Kabara et al 1972). In mice, coconut oil effectively reduced colonization of candida across a range of doses (12 to 30%).

Herbs are rich in phytochemical constituents like polyphenols that possess antioxidant, antimicrobial and immunomodulatory properties. A number of natural products have been shown to be effective in controlling fungi growth including curcumin from turmeric. Trumeric, ginger and Xanthorrhizol, isolated from Curcuma xanthorrhiza a cousin of turmeric in the ginger family have been shown to be effective against multiple Candida species and other opportunistic fungi and as a treatment for the treatment of candidiasis. Garlic’s antibacterial activity has been first stated by Louis Pasteur; and there are also reports of its antifungal and antiviral activities.

Other herbs including Berberine has also been shown to have significant antimicrobial activity against bacteria, viruses, protozoa, fungi, and yeasts (Tan et al 2011). As well as extracts from Trigonella foenum-graecum (fenugreek) seeds, Cinnamomum verum (Celyon cinnamon) bark, Carica papaya (papaya) leaves and seeds and sweet basil leaf herbal oils seem to be highly effective anti-Candida choices.

Disturbances of the bacterial community in the GI tract promote C. albicans colonization suggesting that the normal bacterial microbiota of the GI tract have an inhibitory effect against fungal colonisation and invasion. Lactobacillus spp. appear inhibit the growth and virulence of C. albicans by the production of hydrogen peroxide and organic acids, but not fully eradicate them. They may also exert some effect on the Candida through the immune system. Similar results have also been shown for supplementation with some fungal probiotics, such as Saccharomyces boulardii which compete with Candida species for gut space.

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The healing power of raw cabbage

The healing power of raw cabbage

Another reason to add some of the cabbage family to your daily diet, preferably raw is because of their gut healing properties and how they promote gut health through the gut microbiome. The Brassica family including cabbage, broccoli, brussel sprouts, kale, arugula (rocket), bok choy, cauliflower, collard greens, radish, turnip and others have been recognized for their gut healing and gut health properties for hundreds of years and modern epidemiologic studies have shown a frequent consumption of cruciferous vegetables is associated with lower risk of cancer, especially cancers of the digestive tract, bladder, breast, prostate, and lung. However, only now are we recognizing that many of these benefits are mediated through the microbiome and that their frequent consumption alters the composition of the microbiome.

Cruciferous vegetables are a rich source of glucosinolates a precursor to the Isothiocyanates (ITC), which exhibit powerful biological functions in fighting cancers, cardiovascular, neurodegenerative diseases and gut healing. The Isothiocyanates are a by product of specific plant enzymes (myrosinase) active during chewing or crushing when broccoli is consumed raw or lightly steamed, however, like all enzymes myrosinase is deactivated by cooking and ingestion of cooked broccoli typically provides only about one tenth the amount of isothiocyanates as that from raw broccoli. So to maximize the gut healing, gut health and overall benefits of these foods they are best eaten raw or just lightly steamed.

Instead when cooked cruciferous vegetables are consumed, gut bacteria are mainly responsible for ITC production in the gut. This is highlighted after taking oral antibiotics, the ITCs availability and uptake decreases after eating cooked cruciferous vegetable. It also appears that there is considerable difference in the ability of individuals, due to individual differences in gut microbial community, to produce the isothiocyanates. Although, the gut communitys ability is altered over just 4 days. In one study feeding raw or cooked broccoli for four days or longer both changed the microbiota composition and caused a greater production of isothiocyanates. Interestingly, a three-day withdrawal from broccoli reversed the increased microbial metabolites suggesting that the microbiota requires four or more days of broccoli consumption and is reversible.

The lactic acid bacteria appear to have myrosinase-like activity and the fermented Brassica food products, such as sauerkraut and kimchi, are particularly rich in Lactobacillus, and a diet rich in Brassica may promote Lactobacillus growth in the colon.

 

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A Pecan a day keeps the diabetes and cardiovascular disease away.

A Pecan a day keeps the diabetes and cardiovascular disease away.

A large amount of evidence has shown a high intake of tree nuts is associated with a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), mortality from type 2 diabetes (T2DM), and all-cause mortality.

In this study after 4 weeks on a pecan-rich diet the researchers saw beneficial changes in serum insulin, insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and beta cell function (HOMA-β) as well as cardiometabolic disease. That is a significant reduction in the risk of diabetes2, heart attacks and stroke.

Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are a leading cause of death worldwide, and is primarly caused by inflammation and oxidation. Within the past few decades, there has also been a dramatic increase in diet-related chronic diseases related to CVD risk, i.e., diabetes, obesity, and hypertension, in both industrialized and developing nations. The problem is only getting worse even though we spend more money on pharmaceuticals and the medical system than ever before. Increased production of reactive oxygen species, oxidative stress, and inflammation, are the leading causes of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), arterial hypertension, and dyslipidemia.

A growing body of evidence has shown that a high intake of nuts (all types) is associated with a reduced risk of CVD development, all-cause mortality, and mortality from diabetes. Indeed, a nut-containing diet also contributes to weight control and weight loss despite the large number of calories.

Bioactive compounds present in nuts, include essential fatty acids, vitamins and minerals, fiber, and phytochemicals, have all been shown to reduce inflammation, improving vascular reactivity as well as fasting glucose and insulin sensitivity, and by lowering oxidative stress. Numerous studies have now shown that consumption of nuts is effective in reducing oxidative stress and inflammation. Other studies have shown frequent nut consumption is associated with lower concentrations of inflammation (CRP, IL-6) and some endothelial (the artery lining) markers in clinical trials. In a study of 5,013 participants, a greater intake of nuts was associated with lower amounts of inflammatory biomarkers. Subjects with nut intake of five or more times per week had a 20% nearly 20% reduction in inflammation compared to those who never or almost never consumed nuts. Pistachio nuts, for example, reduce oxidative stress and inflammation. Pistachio kernels have anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties at lower doses than reported previously and decreased inflammation (TNF-α and IL-1β) in a dose-dependent way. That is, the more the participants consumed, the lower the inflammation.

EAT MORE NUTS

But not peanuts and cashews

For much more information on how to reverse diabetes and cardiovascular disease (and all chronic illness) “Overcoming Illness” our latest book is a must read.

https://www.drdingle.com/collections/frontpage/products/overcoming-illness-pre-order

 

Source

A Pecan-Rich Diet Improves Cardiometabolic Risk Factors in Overweight and Obese Adults: A Randomized Controlled Trial

Diane L. McKay 1,*, Misha Eliasziw 2, C. Y. Oliver Chen 1 and Jeffrey B. Blumberg 1http://www.mdpi.com/2072-6643/10/3/339/htm

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Inflammation increses your risk of heart disease (and everything else)

Inflammation increses your risk of heart disease (and everything else)

Chronic inflammation is known to play a major role in the development of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) and related mortality. Various dietary components also have been implicated in playing a major role in the development of various CVDs and research has shown that whole diet and various dietary components have a direct association with inflammation. Consumption of fruit and vegetables has been shown to reduce levels of inflammation. Increased adherence to healthier dietary patterns characterized by increased intake of plant-based foods such as fruit and vegetables, nuts, and whole grains and adherence to a healthier dietary pattern has been shown to help prevent and to manage CVD. An increased intake of polyphenols, anti-oxidants with ability to decreases oxidative stress and inflammation through scavenging free radicals, found in fruits, vegetables and nuts, has also shown to be associated with decreased risk of overall and CVD-related mortality.

While consumption of red meat has been shown to increase inflammation. In a recent meta-analysis, increased intake of processed meat has been shown to be associated with increased risk of CVD mortality.

The Dietary Inflammatory Index (DII) has also been shown to be associated with various chronic inflammation-related health outcomes such as cancer incidence, all-cause and cancer-specific mortality, respiratory conditions such as asthma and cognitive disorders. A recent meta-analysis from nine studies found individuals in the highest versus the lowest DII category showed an overall 40% increased risk of colorectal cancer.

In this study data from 14 studies showed a 36% increase in the risk of CVD between the highest and lowest DII scores and there was an increased risk of CVD risk and mortality of 8% for each one-point increase in the DII score.

Results of this meta-analysis support the importance of adopting a healthier anti-inflammatory diet for preventing CVD incidence and related mortality and a pro-inflammatory diet is associated with increased risk of CVD and CVD mortality.

We are running a course on Inflammation, the DII and inflammation for other aspects of our environment and lifestyle to celebrate the release of our new book "Overcoming Illness" which explains all the information behind inflammation and oxidation and how to reduce your risk of all chronic illness for Diabetes to Dementia.

Overcoming Illness the course

7:00 PM - 9:05 PM Tuesday 6th March 2018

http://tix.yt/overcoming-illness

Read more →

Inflammation increses your risk of heart disease (and everything else)

Inflammation increses your risk of heart disease (and everything else)

Chronic inflammation is known to play a major role in the development of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) and related mortality. Various dietary components also have been implicated in playing a major role in the development of various CVDs and research has shown that whole diet and various dietary components have a direct association with inflammation. Consumption of fruit and vegetables has been shown to reduce levels of inflammation. Increased adherence to healthier dietary patterns characterized by increased intake of plant-based foods such as fruit and vegetables, nuts, and whole grains and adherence to a healthier dietary pattern has been shown to help prevent and to manage CVD. An increased intake of polyphenols, anti-oxidants with ability to decreases oxidative stress and inflammation through scavenging free radicals, found in fruits, vegetables and nuts, has also shown to be associated with decreased risk of overall and CVD-related mortality.

While consumption of red meat has been shown to increase inflammation. In a recent meta-analysis, increased intake of processed meat has been shown to be associated with increased risk of CVD mortality.

The Dietary Inflammatory Index (DII) has also been shown to be associated with various chronic inflammation-related health outcomes such as cancer incidence, all-cause and cancer-specific mortality, respiratory conditions such as asthma and cognitive disorders. A recent meta-analysis from nine studies found individuals in the highest versus the lowest DII category showed an overall 40% increased risk of colorectal cancer.

In this study data from 14 studies showed a 36% increase in the risk of CVD between the highest and lowest DII scores and there was an increased risk of CVD risk and mortality of 8% for each one-point increase in the DII score.

Results of this meta-analysis support the importance of adopting a healthier anti-inflammatory diet for preventing CVD incidence and related mortality and a pro-inflammatory diet is associated with increased risk of CVD and CVD mortality.

We are running a course on Inflammation, the DII and inflammation for other aspects of our environment and lifestyle to celebrate the release of our new book "Overcoming Illness" which explains all the information behind inflammation and oxidation and how to reduce your risk of all chronic illness for Diabetes to Dementia.

Overcoming Illness the course

7:00 PM - 9:05 PM Tuesday 6th March 2018

http://tix.yt/overcoming-illness

Read more →