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A short time between eating your last meal and sleep can increase your risk of breast and prostate cancer.

A short time between eating your last meal and sleep can increase your risk of breast and prostate cancer.

Our modern life involves irregular sleeping and eating patterns that are associated with adverse health effects. Studies have shown late eating habits and short periods between sleep and eating are associated with metabolic syndrome, weight gain and altering the gut microbiome and gut health.
 
This study of breast and prostate cancer patients and their controls in Spain found those sleeping two or more hours after supper had a 20% reduction in cancer risk for breast and prostate cancer combined and in each cancer individually. A similar protection was observed in subjects having supper before 9 pm compared with supper after 10 pm.
The effect of longer breaks between eating and sleep was more pronounced among subjects adhering to cancer prevention recommendations and in morning types.
Adherence to diurnal eating patterns and specifically a long interval between last meal and sleep are associated with a lower cancer risk, stressing the importance of evaluating timing in studies on diet and cancer.
 
source
https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/ijc.31649
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Antibiotics and “The War on Bacteria”

Antibiotics and “The War on Bacteria”

While antibiotics have been lifesaving, the over-prescription of antibiotics has sparked the evolution of drug-resistant strains of life threatening bacteria, resulting in tens of thousands of deaths each year.[1] The US Centers for Disease Control estimate that up to 50% of antibiotics prescribed in the US are unnecessary.[2] Unfortunately, the use of antibiotics is often prescribed for those groups who are more vulnerable to dysbiosis, including infants born via C-section[3] and in those born preterm, compared to term infants born vaginally,[4] potentially compounding the problems. Micro-organisms such as bacteria, fungi, viruses, and parasites cause many of the world’s diseases, yet only bacterial infections are usually susceptible to treatment with commonly prescribed antibiotics.

However, more subtle side effects of antibiotics on the gut microbiome are only just beginning to be discovered. Broad-spectrum antibiotics can impact up to 30% of the bacteria among the human microbiota, resulting in severe loss of species and function[5] and begins immediately following antibiotic administration. The effects can sometimes last for years after its cessation,[6] and may also lead to the total extinction of some beneficial microbial species. As few as three days of treatment with the most commonly prescribed antibiotics can result in sustained reductions in microbiota diversity.[7] A typical two-week course of high-dose antibiotic treatment, as might be used for an ear infection, can wipe out most of the beneficial gut microbes.

These antibiotic-induced changes in the microbiota have been linked to many disease states including increased infections, metabolic disturbances, obesity, autoimmunity,[8] and mental health conditions. Common outcomes of antibiotics the antibiotic-disturbed gut microbiota are diarrhea and infections with Clostridium difficile,[9] particularly in infants.[10]

Early life exposure to antibiotics presents the greatest risk of long-term damage to the gut microbiota and the more you take, the worse it is.[11] In young children, antibiotics may change the development of the “adult” microbiota, and not allow its normal maturation.[12] It has also been hypothesized to cause a delay in microbial maturation from six to 12 months after birth.[13] Early life exposure is also associated with numerous diseases later in life including IBD,[14] obesity,[15] and asthma, as well as the development of immune-mediated[16] metabolic and neurological diseases.[17]

In a meta-analysis of eight studies including 12,082 subjects, antibiotic use in the first year of life was significantly associated with two-fold (200%) increased chance of the child having asthma.[18] One study reported the use of antibiotics in newborns increased the risk of developing asthma by 24 times. Probiotics during the neonatal period were protective and reduced the risk by as much as 86% for childhood asthma for kids at risk.[19] Studies of mice treated with antibiotics in early life revealed altered microbial populations within the gut microbiota and consequently increased the susceptibility of these mice to asthma.[20]

Antibiotic use has also been shown to have long-term effects on brain neurochemistry and behavior. Such use is known to alter the intestinal microbiome with subsequent changes in microbiota to gut-brain axis[21] and result in poorer neuro-cognitive outcomes later in life.[22]

Even treatment with a single antibiotic course was associated with a 25% higher risk for depression and the risk increased with recurrent antibiotic exposures to 40% for two to five courses and 56% for more than five courses of antibiotics. The higher the rates of antibiotic use, the higher the rates of depression.[23] Animal studies have shown that high doses of a cocktail of antibiotics induced lasting changes in gut microbiota associated with behavioural alterations.[24]

Animal studies of early life exposure to antibiotics show lasting immune and metabolic consequences.[25] Administration of low doses of penicillin to mice early in life increases the risk of weight gain and obesity and promotes lipid accumulation by altering the gut microbiota.[26] Mice treated continuously with low-dose penicillin from one week before birth until weaning exhibited higher body weight and fat mass in adulthood, although the microbial structure returned to normal after four weeks of antibiotics cessation.[27] There is also evidence of antibiotics playing a role in the development of IBD in children[28] and that antibiotic usage during the first year of life was more common in those diagnosed with IBD later in life.[29]

Antibiotics and pregnancy

In human studies, mother’s use of antibiotics during pregnancy is consistently associated with cow’s milk allergy,[30] wheeze, asthma,[31] and atopic dermatitis,[32] with the strongest association for antibiotic use in the third trimester of pregnancy.[33] A study of 306 children with asthma showed that mother’s use of antibiotics during pregnancy increased the risk by a whopping four times (390%).[34] Low-dose penicillin in late pregnancy and early postnatal life in the offspring of mice resulted in lasting effects on gut microbiota, increased brain inflammation, and resulted in anxiety-like behaviours and displays of aggression.[35] Similar results have been shown for antibiotic exposure through breastfeeding.[36]

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[1] Fleming-Dutra et al., 2016.

[2] Fleming-Dutra et al., 2016.

[3] Penders et al., 2006.

[4] Forsgren et al., 2017.

[5] Francino, 2016.

[6] Jakobsson et al., 2010.

[7] Shira et al., 2016.

[8] Francino, 2016.

[9] Ng et al., 2013.

[10] Rousseau et al., 2011.

[11] Fouhy et al., 2012; Tanaka et al., 2009.

[12] Bokulich et al., 2016.

[13] Ibid, 2016.

[14] Hviid et al., 2011.

[15] Azad et al., 2014.

[16] Metsälä et al., 2013.

[17] Arrieta et al., 2014.

[18] Marra et al., 2006.

[19] Zhang et al., 2017.

[20] Russell et al., 2012.

[21] Rogers et al., 2016; Tochitani et al., 2016.

[22] Russell et al., 2013.

[23] Lurie et al., 2015.

[24] Bercik, P. et al., 2011; Desbonnet, L. et al., 2015; Fröhlich, E. E. et al., 2016; Wang, T. et al., 2015.

[25] Russell et al., 2013; Cox et al., 2014.

[26] Cox et al., 2014.

[27] Ibid, 2014.

[28] Shaw et al., 2010;  Ortqvist et al., 2017.

[29] Shaw et al., 2010.

[30] Chu et al., 2015.

[31] Stensballe et al., 2013; Kashanian et al., 2017; Mulder et al., 2016; Murk et al., 2011.

[32] Timm et al., 2017.

[33] Zhao et al., 2015; Wang et al., 2017.

[34] Zhang et al., 2017.

[35] Leclercq et al., 2017.

[36] Kummeling et al., 2007.

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Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) and increased illness

Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) and increased illness

The human stomach, when healthy, is not a suitable host for micro-organisms, but in pathological conditions such as gastritis, when gastric acid secretion is impaired, microbial overgrowth can be observed. The use of gastric acid suppression drugs has been shown to have profound effects on the microbiome.[1] Acid-blocking drugs, or proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) used for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) to reduce gastric acid secretion, are among the most commonly prescribed medications in the world with approximately 6%–15% of the general population receiving acid suppression therapy.[2] Once initiated, they are often used for long periods of time without question,[3] despite the guidelines saying “for short term use only.”

PPIs increase the stomach pH to make it less acidic,[4] which is what they are designed to do, and as a result, change the composition of the intestinal microbiota[5] and impact the pH of the rest of the gut. They are associated with a decrease in small bowel beneficial Bifidobacteria and increase in the toxic gram-negative bacteria, as well as being associated with a significant decline in microbial diversity within seven days of beginning therapy.[6]

PPIs dramatically increase the risk of stomach bacterial overgrowth (SBO) and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO), with increased risk of these bacteria getting into the blood[7] and the potentially fatal infection, Clostridium difficile.[8] Bifidobacteriaceae, important and beneficial bacteria of human gastrointestinal microbiota, can over-colonise the stomach of people with low stomach acid. Bifidobacteriaceae species, typically found in the oral cavity, readily colonise the low acid stomach[9] and become good bacteria but in the wrong place as a result of altered pH.

Proton pump inhibitors also promote progression of both alcoholic and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in mice and contribute to the increasing incidence of chronic liver disease as a result of dysbiosis.[10] The list of side effects for PPIs is extensive, serious and even life-threatening and they are all mediated through the gut.

A growing number of studies are showing connections between autoimmune conditions linked with dysbiosis, including antibiotics and the use of protein pump inhibitors (PPIs) in controlling gastric reflux.[11] The use of PPIs can potentially create far greater problems in the long run.

 

[1] Krezalek et al., 2016; Mackenzie et al., 2017.

[2] Johansen et al., 2014.

[3] Reimer and Bytzer, 2009.

[4] O’May et al., 2005.

[5] Bajaj et al., 2014; Imhann et al., 2016; Jackson et al., 2016.

[6] Seto et al., 2014; Wallace et al., 2011.

[7] Choung et al., 2011.

[8] Lo and Chan, 2013; Janarthanan et al., 2012.

[9] Mattarelli, 2014.

[10] Llorente et al., 2017; Reveles et al., 2017.

[11] Andresson et al., 2016.

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Gut health, gut integrity and your health

Gut health, gut integrity and your health

The integrity of our gut and our gut health is so important to our health but has largely been ignored until recently. The mucous membrane absorbs and assimilates foods and serves as a barrier to pathogens and other toxic substances. When this integrity is compromised the permeability of the gut may be altered, gut function erodes and we end up with many health conditions associated with inflammation and leaky gut.

The gut lining is composed of close fitting, thin cells separated by tight junctures, like a thin protein mortar. When the barrier is disrupted the intestines permeability increases allowing larger particles, bacteria, undigested foods or toxins to cross the barrier. This intestinal permeability, called leaky Gut, is linked with virtually all the gut related disorders including ulcerative colitis, Crohn’s disease, celiacs disease, and auto immune conditions including inflammatory joint disease, ankylosing spondylitis, juvenile onset arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, diabetes mellitus type one and primary biliary cirrhosis.

To maintain integrity and normal function of intestine, a delicate equilibrium must be reached between the microbiota and intestinal immune system.[1] In a healthy body the immune system protects us against invasion and controls the commensal microorganisms. In return the beneficial bacteria provide essential nutrients to the gut cells and promote healthy immune responses in the gut.

A healthy microbiome contributes to the maintenance of intestinal epithelium barrier integrity maintaining the tight junctures, promoting intestinal cell repair, and even ensuring a healthy rate of cell turnover. It does this by maintenance of local cell nutrition and circulation and protection against pathogenic microorganisms.

Unlike most other cells in the body that get their energy and nutrients from the blood supply, more than 50% of the energy needs of the small intestine and more than 80% of the energy of the large intestines (where most of our microbiome is) comes directly from the food in the gut. This is not just a one off but with each turning over of gut cells which is over a period of just days, the barrier has to be continually re-established. The end result of this mutually beneficial co-habitation is a symbiotic relationship between the two partners, us and our microbiome. Any change in the relative proportions of the different bacteria alters the subsequent nutrients available and maintenance and protection for the digestive tract. If the right food and conditions are not there for a healthy microbiome then the nutrients are not available for the gut wall and the cells are damaged leading to damage to the integrity of the gut wall and leaky gut. This highlights the importance of eating the right foods for the microbiome to do their job and to maintain optimal gut health.

[1] Magalhaes et al., 2007.

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Queensland Gut Healing Tour. 2018

Queensland Gut Healing Tour. 2018

After sell out talks around Australia Dr Peter and Martine Dingle return for their long-awaited Queensland

Celebrating their release of 3 new books on Gut health and chronic illness, “Gut Secrets. A blueprint to your microbiome and your health”, “Ready, Set Gut Health” and “Overcoming Illness”.

Kingaroy. Monday June 11

Kingaroy RSL White Room. Markwell St & Short St.6.30-9.00 PM

http://tix.yt/guthealinggutsecrets-kingaroyjune11

 

Gympie Tuesday June 12

Gympie RSL. Orchird Room, 217 Mary St. 6.30-9.00 PM

http://tix.yt/guthealinggutsecretsgympie-12-6

 

Sunshine Coast, Marcoola Monday June 18

Surfair 923 David Low Way Marcoola. 6.30-9.00 PM

http://tix.yt/guthealinggutsecrets-sunshinecoast-18-6

 

Maryborough Tuesday June 19

Maryborough RSL, 163 Lennox st. 6.30-9.00 PM

http://tix.yt/guthealinggutsecrets-maryborough-19-6

 

Bundaberg Wednesday June 20

Vietnam Vetrans Hall, 44 May Street, Bundaberg. 6.30-9.00 PM

http://tix.yt/guthealinggutsecrets-bundaberg-20-6

 

Rockhampton. Thursday June 21

Rockhampton Leagues Club. George and Cambridge Streets. 6.30-9.00 PM

http://tix.yt/guthealinggutsecrets-rockhmapton-21-6

 

Gladstone. Friday June 22

Gladstone Tennis Centre. Glenlyon St, Gladstone. 6.30-9.00 PM

http://tix.yt/guthealinggutsecrets-gladstone-22-6

 

Toowoomba. Monday June 25

Toowoomba Golf Club. 235-323 Rowbotham Street. Middle Ridge. 6.30-9.00 PM

http://tix.yt/guthealing-toowoomba-25-6

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