Dr Dingle's Blog / formaldehyde

Do plants really clean the office air?

Do plants really clean the office air?

Here is a little paper I wrote many years ago showing that plants are not effective at cleaning the indoor air.
Formaldehyde is a toxic substance with adverse health effects detectable at low concentrations. Formaldehyde causes irritation of the eyes, skin and respiratory tract, wheezing, nausea, coughing, diarrhoea, vomiting, dizziness and lethargy at levels as low as 50 parts per billion (ppb) (0.05 ppm). Formaldehyde has also been associated with aggravation of asthma, emphysema, hayfever and allergy problems at low levels (EPA, 1987). Formaldehyde is currently considered a potential carcinogen to humans (EPA, 1987). Formaldehyde is a ubiquitous gas found in elevated concentrations in indoor environments. Concentrations of formaldehyde are typically an order of magnitude greater inside buildings compared to outdoor air. Formaldehyde concentrations are particularly high in portable buildings due to the presence of more formaldehyde emitting materials and the relatively smaller interior volumes of air. Major sources of formaldehyde indoors are pressed wood products, such as particle board and plywood, and urea formaldehyde foam insulation. Other sources include carpets, curtains, floor linings, paper products, cosmetics and soaps, tobacco smoke and gas combustion. Methods to reduce indoor formaldehyde include source removal or use of non- polluting materials, emission reduction through physical or chemical treatments and dilution through ventilation and air purification. While most solutions involve dilution through ventilation, increased interest in the scientific literature as well as in the popular media has been given to the use of plants to purify air in buildings . Most studies however, have been conducted in the laboratory and are difficult to extrapolate to real life situations.
Reducing Formaldehyde Exposure in Office Environments Using Plants
  • March 2000
  • Bulletin of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology 64(2):302-8
  • DOI:
  • 10.1007/s001289910044
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Sickness from the smelling industry and the health effects of fragrance compounds.

Sickness from the smelling industry and the health effects of fragrance compounds.

In the past few decades, synthetic fragrance compounds have become ubiquitous components of personal care and household cleaning products. Overwhelming consumerism trends have led to the excess usage of these chemicals. It has been observed that this fragrance-laden unhealthy lifestyle runs parallel with the unprecedented rates of diabetes, cancer, neural ailments, teratogenicity, and transgender instances. The link between fragrances as and the health outcomes can remain latent for decades.

The adverse effects of the fragrance constituents as phthalates, paraben, glutaraldehyde, hydroperoxides, oil of turpentine, metals, nitro musks, and essential oils, among others, are being identified. The endocrine-immune-neural axis pathways of these chemicals are being proven. Despite this a majority of the vulnerable populations are unaware and unmotivated to avoid these 'slow poisons'. Possible mechanism for thier action include acidosis, aromatase upregulation, estrogen hyperproduction and inflammation.

Fragrance compounds share structural similarity with carcinogenic environmental hydrocarbons are able to mimic estrogen, the powerful signaling hormone, which underlies the majority of morbidities.

 

source

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28478814

 

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