Dr Dingle's Blog / EDC

Environmental Estrogens and Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDC's)

Environmental Estrogens and Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDC's)

Since the 1980's, there has been a growing amount of research toward the potential interaction between these environmental estrogens and wild animals, with a number of reports detailing the emergence of 'feminised wildlife’ around the world, and a range of adverse effects in humans including decreased sperm count, increased cases of testicular cancer and testicular abnormalities, increased breast cancer in men and women and premature or precocious puberty. Other adverse health outcomes linked with EDC’s include headache, migraine, depression, gastrointestinal disturbances, insomnia, changes in breast tissue and in vaginal bleeding. More chronic symptoms affect the cardiovascular system, the skin (itching, rash, abnormal pigmentation), the gallbladder, and tumours particularly of the breast but also uterus, cervix, vagina and liver. While other studies have shown increases in the organ weight of estrogen-sensitive tissues such as the uterus, and calcium and bone metabolism are all examples of the estrogenic effects. Even how we age and age at menopause can be affected by these chemicals. In support of this at least one professional and very conservative group, the Endocrine Society, has concluded that sufficient evidence now exists linking endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) to adverse human reproductive effects, including possible epigenetic and trans-generational effects.

Unfortunately, our babies are being born pre-polluted with chemicals detectable in their blood, in the placenta and in amniotic fluid because of exposure to these chemicals during pregnancy and throughout the mother’s life. The placental barrier has been shown to allow these chemicals to cross, as many of them have been measured in human fetal cord blood, fetal serum, human amniotic fluid and even newborn stools (meconium). Exposure to these chemicals before birth poses a serious health risks to developing fetus, infants and young children as shown by the increasing adverse effects including negative birth outcomes, childhood obesity and increasing intellectual disabilities. It is believed that current levels of environmental estrogen exposure results in lower birth weights, smaller head circumferences, poorer neuromuscular maturity and visual recognition, delays in psychomotor development, short term memory problems, and growth retardation in newborn babies. Fetal exposure to these environmental estrogens are suspected of disrupting thyroid functioning, sexual differentiation of the brain in foetal development and cognitive motor function and cause anxious behaviour. They are also able to bind to neurotransmitters such as epinephrine, neuroepinophrine and dopamine enabling estrogens to influence the body's central nervous system (CNS). Environmental estrogens have also been shown to effect the body’s immune system.

Studies have found strong links with exposure to excessive levels of estrogen in males with penis abnormalities, lower libido, congenital anomalies, failure of the testes to descend and testicular cancer, reduced penis size and increased embryo mortality.

What is most concerning regarding control of these chemicals is that there are no indications given or regulations set regarding the minimal age at which they should be used or exposed to them. Increasingly, pregnant mothers, infants, pre-pubescent and pubescent children are being exposed to a large number of products containing these chemicals, with no research to show that exposure is safe during these critical periods of development.

Equally strong is the evidence that these same chemicals can cause some of the most common cancers: prostate and testicular cancer in men and breast cancer in women. One of the most troubling is their association with breast cancer. Breast cancer is the major cancer affecting women in the Western world and one of the most disturbing and well documented current trends is the alarming increase in breast cancer incidence over the past few decades. Fifty years ago the risk rate was one woman in 20; today it is one in 8 and approximately two-thirds of breast tumors are estrogen receptive, and environmental estrogens like parabens, phthalates and BPA are known to bind to estrogen receptors. Estrogen-dependent cancers, such as breast cancer, are known to be highly responsive to estrogens for growth. Even more disturbing is the increase in numbers of young girls developing breast cancer.

 

https://www.drdingle.com/collections/book-sales/products/dangerous-beauty-1

 

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Europe says BPA (bisphenol A) is an endocrine disruptor and needs to be regulated more heavily

Europe says BPA (bisphenol A) is an endocrine disruptor and needs to be regulated more heavily

BPA has received a lot of media attention over the last decade, primarily the effects of this chemical on our reproductive health and infants.

This week the European Chemicals Agency (ECHA) has classified bisphenol A, a chemical found in many common plastic products, as an endocrine disruptor and a ‘substance of very high concern’ due to its “probable serious effects to human health which give rise to an equivalent level of concern to carcinogenic, mutagenic, toxic to reproduction substances”.

France banned BPA in baby bottles in 2010 and in food containers in 2012. The new European classification for BPA follows a proposal by the French food security agency (ANSES) from February this year. ECHA’s member state committee, made up of representatives from all 28 EU countries, agreed the change unanimously on 16 June.

But nothing in Australia?

Despite its widely known health effects BPA is still used in a variety of consumer products containing epoxy resins, polyester-styrene, and polycarbonate plastics. It is added to various plastics in many different consumer products including plastic bottles while epoxy resins are used as protective coatings for metal food and beverage cans. It is found in every can and most plastic bottles unless they are labelled BPA free. Bisphenol A is extensively used in the food-packaging industry so even food take away wrappers may be contaminated with BPA. It is also found in thermal paper for receipts and fax, however, human exposure occurs mainly from the direct contact of food with Bisphenol A containing plastics. Other exposure routes that are of particular concern are Bisphenol A leaching from babies’ feeding bottles, and Bisphenol A BPA leaching from dental fillings and sealants. In one study BPA was detected in 15 conventional samples, including dish and laundry detergent, tub and tile cleaner, soaps, lotions, shampoo, conditioner, shaving cream, nail polish, and sunscreen. Overall, human exposure to BPA is frequent and widespread, and more than 90% of individuals have detectable amounts of BPA in urine as reported by studies around the world. In a study in the USA BPA was found in 92.6% of urine samples from 2,517 people across the country.

BPA was first reported to impact the reproductive system of female rats in the 1930s. Since then there have been hundreds of published studies showing BPA effects in animals even at very low levels (μg/kg/d) and at levels we would normally be exposed to on a daily basis. It appears that these low levels may even be more of problem on health that much higher levels.

I have written extensively on this in my new book Dangerous Beauty

https://www.drdingle.com/products/dangerous-beauty-pre-release

Read more →

Europe says BPA (bisphenol A) is an endocrine disruptor and needs to be regulated more heavily

Europe says BPA (bisphenol A) is an endocrine disruptor and needs to be regulated more heavily

BPA has received a lot of media attention over the last decade, primarily the effects of this chemical on our reproductive health and infants.

This week the European Chemicals Agency (ECHA) has classified bisphenol A, a chemical found in many common plastic products, as an endocrine disruptor and a ‘substance of very high concern’ due to its “probable serious effects to human health which give rise to an equivalent level of concern to carcinogenic, mutagenic, toxic to reproduction substances”.

France banned BPA in baby bottles in 2010 and in food containers in 2012. The new European classification for BPA follows a proposal by the French food security agency (ANSES) from February this year. ECHA’s member state committee, made up of representatives from all 28 EU countries, agreed the change unanimously on 16 June.

But nothing in Australia?

Despite its widely known health effects BPA is still used in a variety of consumer products containing epoxy resins, polyester-styrene, and polycarbonate plastics. It is added to various plastics in many different consumer products including plastic bottles while epoxy resins are used as protective coatings for metal food and beverage cans. It is found in every can and most plastic bottles unless they are labelled BPA free. Bisphenol A is extensively used in the food-packaging industry so even food take away wrappers may be contaminated with BPA. It is also found in thermal paper for receipts and fax, however, human exposure occurs mainly from the direct contact of food with Bisphenol A containing plastics. Other exposure routes that are of particular concern are Bisphenol A leaching from babies’ feeding bottles, and Bisphenol A BPA leaching from dental fillings and sealants. In one study BPA was detected in 15 conventional samples, including dish and laundry detergent, tub and tile cleaner, soaps, lotions, shampoo, conditioner, shaving cream, nail polish, and sunscreen. Overall, human exposure to BPA is frequent and widespread, and more than 90% of individuals have detectable amounts of BPA in urine as reported by studies around the world. In a study in the USA BPA was found in 92.6% of urine samples from 2,517 people across the country.

BPA was first reported to impact the reproductive system of female rats in the 1930s. Since then there have been hundreds of published studies showing BPA effects in animals even at very low levels (μg/kg/d) and at levels we would normally be exposed to on a daily basis. It appears that these low levels may even be more of problem on health that much higher levels.

I have written extensively on this in my new book Dangerous Beauty

https://www.drdingle.com/products/dangerous-beauty-pre-release

Read more →