Dr Dingle's Blog / diabetes

Stop being sick

Stop being sick

The current medical model, which focuses on treating the symptoms with toxic pharmaceuticals, rather than preventing illness, is simply not working. We use more drugs than ever before and we are sicker than ever before. Unfortunately, most of us are very sick by the time we recognise we are ill or decide to do anything about our health. It is never too late, but it is more difficult. By comparison, if you have not serviced your car for 20 years, you don’t expect to repair the damage with one oil change.

The key to treating chronic illness is to act sooner rather than later. As the adage goes, “Prevention is better than cure.” You can, however, take important, health-saving steps at any time.

We need a paradigm shift when it comes to our lifestyle and nutrition. Previously we thought of “nutrition” as the Food Pyramid, 2&5, the RDI (recommended daily intake/allowance) of vitamin C, B vitamins, iron and calcium, counting calories and choosing “low-fat” foods. This approach is outdated and extremely dangerous, and in fact is contributing significantly to the level of chronic illness we have today. We need a lot more nutrition and a great deal more variety—not just the minimum amount to prevent scurvy or beriberi, but the right amounts for optimal health.

In the beginning, there were healthy, whole foods and healthy lifestyles; people took responsibility for their own health. Now most of the world is dying from food-related illness. Half the world is dying from not enough food and the other half from too much nutrient-depleted, calorie-dense, contaminated food. Times have changed and so has the way we need to look at food, nutrition and our health. Chronic illnesses such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease and cancer are now the biggest killers in developed countries with the developing world rapidly catching up. Obesity has overtaken smoking as the single biggest cause of avoidable death in many developed countries.

Understanding some basics of chronic illness is the key to fixing the problem. The simplest place to start is with the underlying conditions that lead to chronic illness. This is what I call the “disease triad” of oxidation, inflammation, and acidosis. The triad, which you will read about in this book, is the underlying cause of all chronic illness in our bodies. The root cause of the illness, however, is what causes these three conditions, which are present in every form of chronic illness and prevent the body from healing and recovering. If we reduce them or even stop them from being out of control, then we can allow our bodies to heal. But the more advanced the chronic illness, the more we have to do in order to slow down and rebalance the triad. By the time modern medicine recognises that you have diabetes, blocked arteries or cancer, you have already had possibly decades of high inflammation, oxidation and acidosis.

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Creating Medical Myths

Creating Medical Myths

Creating myths

History tells us that when money is involved the medical establishments will do anything to keep profits and power. Good examples of this include tobacco and alcohol. Most people may not remember but the various medical associations around the world have been prominent supporters of these deadly products in the pursuit of profit. All too often our memories are too short or we think the basic behaviours of people will change.

While evidence of the toxic effects of tobacco smoke has been around for hundreds of years, the correlation between tobacco and cancer was first officially reported in 1939 in a study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association. It took until 1962 before any action was taken. However, even after being exposed, the tobacco industry has continued to survive and even thrive in some places. They even continue to produce evidence to show that tobacco smoke is not bad for you and fund medical and health journals to print these studies.

Prior to 1962, the American Cancer Society would admit only a possible link between smoking and lung cancer and was associated with many aspects of the tobacco industry including marketing products and trying to make a “safer cigarette.” The medical establishments including the AMA continued to back the tobacco industry even under an avalanche of evidence and ran prominent ads in their medical journals. The ACS, like governments around the world today, including state and federal here in Australia, have delayed tobacco controls that could have helped and could still help a lot of people. A prominent Australian premier repeatedly blocked tobacco control legislation in the early 2000s only to take a lucrative position as a director in a major tobacco company when he retired from politics. This political corruption was and still is rampant in all Western nations. I saw firsthand the delaying tactics of governments to introduce tobacco control legislation despite more than 50 years of good science and thousands of studies—even a couple of studies I did with my students.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture to this day continues to support tobacco growing and export to third world nations. This is the same organisation that gave us the food pyramid, which was created for the sole purpose of selling more grain products (at any expense) and classified pizza as a vegetable in 2012 so it could be sold to American schools.

We learnt from smoking. Stop smoking and you reduce mortality and morbidity. It was hard but we educated the public against the vested interests of the tobacco lobby and we started to really win the war on cancer.

Along with the forebears of modern medicine like Hippocrates and Galen, in 1676 Richard Wiseman, a prominent English surgeon, wrote that diet could promote cancer especially the consumption of alcohol and meat. Despite this knowledge hundreds and even thousands of years earlier, for the past three decades health and medical professionals have been promoting wine as a healthful drink based on no science whatsoever and going against more than 50 years of good science.

This myth was started when early studies showed that the highest consumer of saturated fat in Europe was the French but they also has the lowest death rate from cardiovascular disease with four per 100,000 for women and 22 per 100,000 for men. For years this was called the “French paradox,” which I’ll write more about in the chapter on saturated fats. In fact what it showed was that most of the countries in that region had high fat and low CVD so maybe fat was not linked with CVD. This did not fit the current medical myth, as fat and cholesterol were the number one enemies. So they made up a myth and said wine was good for you because the French drink more wine, despite 50 years of good science linking all forms of alcohol with mortality and morbidity. The myth also failed to mention the low-key and relaxed, low-stress lifestyle of the French, the long lunches and sipping on wine over a long meal talking with friends. There are so many factors to consider but wine was the simplest and most easily understood by the public and the most profitable. Very wrong but easily understood. Now, 30 years later the ads tell people that any alcohol is bad for you and we are supposed to ignore the 30 years of poor advice that spawned a generation of people justifying drinking more alcohol.

Similarly the Japanese are one of the longest-lived populations in the world despite their high rates of smoking and stress. They also eat a little bit of fermented soya bean in the form of tempeh and soya sauce. So in the manufacturing of another health myth, the food industry, which was already feeding vast amounts of soya to cattle, along with the medical industry, saw an opportunity to tell everyone to eat more soya products because they contain some “phyto estrogens” and because women in Asia have very low levels of breast cancer. Asian culture has a little bit of fermented soya along with lots of green vegetables and a large amount of fish and seafood including seaweed. Only now we are starting to wake up to the fact that soya milk and soya products are toxic to the body if they are not fermented. Not to mention all the chemicals in our Western lifestyle that mimic oestrogen and that are linked to breast and prostate cancers.

Once started, a myth is hard to break down especially with billions of dollars of funding behind it. But even people with the best intentions can get caught up in it. At one point everyone thought the world was flat and the sun rotated around it. If it were not for science and some very courageous people, some who lost their lives because of their convictions, we would still be thinking the same.

We continually hear about the miracle cure that is just around the corner. Every month a current affairs program introduces the next one. Ninety-nine percent go no further than an initial media blitz and at best one percent have a minimal, if any, effect. But it is an attempt by the drug industry and media to convince the public they need to put more money into research to find a cure—even when we already know how to prevent the illness and in many cases reverse the condition. Unfortunately none of these miracle drugs have ever come to fruition and billions of dollars are wasted, but even more unfortunate is that people don’t hear the real solutions such as healthy nutritious lifestyles.

The drug companies spend billions of dollars trying to convince people that they are sicker than they actually are and are very ill or have an illness that has only just been made up. They seem to be able to turn almost anything into a disease as long as there is a drug to treat it. Suddenly all the normal conditions we suffer and learn to get over are life-threatening illnesses that need to be medicated. We are literally creating diseases that we need to treat with drugs. In psychiatry the new manual, the “DSM-5,” labels practically every human emotion a mental disorder and all those modern disorders require treatment with high-profit pharmaceuticals. Recently they classified caffeine withdrawal, restless leg, and too much online activity each as a disease but not self-harm?

We have created illnesses out of normal conditions and require specialists to manipulate and control some of the most natural aspects of life, such as giving birth, ageing and menopause. Accepting them would be too simple. Better still, we can approach them by making healthy lifestyle and nutrition choices.  

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It is inflammation not cholesterol.

It is inflammation not cholesterol.

Here is another nail in the coffin of the cholesterol theory. For the last 40 years the cholesterol theory (yes theory) has continued to change to suit the growing evidence against it. In science if a theory is disproved it is tossed out. Not this one. It keeps being reborn and of course you are now told it is the oxidized LDL cholesterol. And it is. But the problem is not the cholesterol it is the oxidation which leads to inflammation. Stop the oxidation and stop the inflammation.

The study—which monitored more than 10,000 heart patients—was inspired by the observation that around half of the people who suffer a heart attack have normal cholesterol levels and that lowering cholesterol has no significant reduction in mortality. The study showed that reducing inflammation without affecting lipid (cholesterol) levels reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease.

In the study they used a drug, canakinumab, involving 10,061 patients with previous heart attack (myocardial infarction) and a high-sensitivity C-reactive protein- inflammation. At a follow-up of 3.7 years, the incidence rate for heart attacks was 4.50 percent in the placebo group, 4.11 and about 3.90 percent for the higher dose groups. In medicine this is seen as breakthrough and a 16% reduction. The need for by-pass surgery and angioplasty was also reduced by 30 per cent. Cholesterol-lowering statins have a far lower success rate.

However, Canakinumab was associated with a higher incidence of fatal infection than was placebo, that is one in every 1,000 participants suffered a fatal infection. In other words, 10 people died as a direct result of taking the drug. There was no significant difference in all-cause mortality (canakinumab vs. placebo). The cost of the drug treatment is estimated to be more than $65000 US a year.

Despite the results the take-home message is that it is not cholesterol it is inflammation, cholesterol, is associated with CVD but not the cause. The real take home message is that inflammation is best controlled through diet and lifestyle.

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Probiotics to lower inflammation

Probiotics to lower inflammation

Probiotics

Numerous studies have now shown the benefits of probiotics and prebiotics in reducing inflammation and oxidation. A recent meta-analysis indicated a significant reduction in serum CRP following probiotics.[1] Studies suggest the consumption of probiotic yogurt containing L. acidophilus and Bifidobacterium animalis in pregnant women for nine weeks led to a reduction in inflammation (CRP) as it did for colorectal cancer,[2] autoimmune disease,[3] and chronic kidney disease.[4] A number of studies have shown that prebiotics can benefit the elderly who suffer from chronic inflammation by improving their gut microbiota and immune function, ultimately reducing inflammation and oxidation. An 8 g daily prebiotic mixture given for three weeks to elderly subjects reduced inflammation (IL-6) improved T cell counts –immune function.[5]

The anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties of probiotics are thought to act by reducing gut inflammation.[6] Good gut bacteria produce short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) following the fermentation of soluble fibre by gut bacteria like butyrate, propionate and acetate, which are anti-inflammatory.[7] The probiotics, Lactobacillus plantarum, isolated from Chinese traditional Tibetan kefir grains, had strong reducing capacities, lipid peroxidation inhibition capacities, iron-chelating abilities, various free radical scavenging capacities and potent antioxidant activity.[8]

 

[1] Mazidi et al. Nutrients 2017.

[2] Anderson et al. 2004.

[3] Shoaei et al. 2015.

[4] Mazid et al. 2016.

[5] Guigoz et al. 2002.

[6] Alipour et al. 2014.

[7] Tedelind et al. 2007.

[8] Tang et al. 2017.

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Nuts for weight loss

Nuts for weight loss

Despite the large amount of calories and fat in nuts they are an exceptional food for weight loss. You have already heard me tell you to stop counting calories and worrying about fat. Well here is the best example. Nuts are full of nutrients, including healthy fats, and rate at the top of the list for satiety. A number of studies have found that snacking on nuts helps you stay satiated throughout the day and eat less at meals. Nuts are a great source of protein, essential fats, vitamins and minerals. The fats found in nuts promote efficiency in the utilization of proteins and carbohydrates, as well as aiding in absorption of fat-soluble vitamins. Seeds, like nuts, are nutrient-dense and rich in fibre, a major source of prebiotics to feed the good gut bacteria.

In fact, the consumption of some fats, in particular medium chain triglycerides (found in coconut), has been shown to speed up weight loss. Despite the high fat content in nuts and some fruits like avocados, they don’t contribute to weight gain. In fact studies are now showing, those who consume more nuts are the ones who do not put on weight compared to the low nut consumption groups. This is probably due to eating fewer junk food snacks and the benefits of the nutrients on the body’s metabolism. Raw nuts with no added sugar, salt, oil or any other.

And they are good for you.

For more information on real weight loss based on science and my proven program over 20 years go to

https://www.drdingle.com/collections/frontpage/products/unlock-your-genes-for-weight-loss

Here are some references

  1. Abazarfard Z, Salehi M, Keshavarzi S. The effect of almonds on anthropometric measurements and lipid profile in overweight and obese females in a weight reduction program: a randomized controlled clinical trial. J Res Med Sci. 2014;19:457–64.PubMedPubMed CentralGoogle Scholar
  2. Afshin A, Micha R, Khatibzadeh S, Mozaffarian D. Consumption of nuts and legumes and risk of incident ischemic heart disease, stroke, and diabetes: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Am J Clin Nutr. 2014;100:278–88.View ArticlePubMedPubMed CentralGoogle Scholar
  3. Bao Y, Han J, Hu FB, Giovannucci EL, Stampfer MJ, Willett WC, et al. Association of nut consumption with total and cause-specific mortality. N Engl J Med. 2013;369:2001–11.View ArticlePubMedPubMed CentralGoogle Scholar
  4. Bes-Rastrollo M, Wedick NM, Martinez-Gonzalez MA, et al. Prospective study of nut consumption, long-term weight change, and obesity risk in women. Am J Clin Nutr. 2009;89:1913–9.View ArticlePubMedPubMed CentralGoogle Scholar
  5. Brennan AM, Sweeney LL, Liu X, Mantzoros CS. Walnut consumption increases satiation but has no effect on insulin resistance or the metabolic profile over a 4-day period. Obesity. 2010;18:1176–82.View ArticlePubMedGoogle Scholar
  6. Del Gobbo LC, Falk MC, Feldman R, et al. Effects of tree nuts on blood lipids, apolipoproteins, and blood pressure: systematic review, meta-analysis, and dose-response of 61 controlled intervention trials. Am J Clin Nutr. 2015;102:1347–56.View ArticlePubMedPubMed CentralGoogle Scholar
  7. Foster GD, Shantz KL, Vander Veur SS, et al. A randomized trial of the effects of an almond-enriched, hypocaloric diet in the treatment of obesity. Am J Clin Nutr. 2012;96:249–54.View ArticlePubMedPubMed CentralGoogle Scholar
  8. Freisling H, Noh H, Slimani N, et al. Nut intake and 5-year changes in body weight and obesity risk in adults: results from the EPIC-PANACEA study. Eur J Nutr. 2017; doi: 1007/s00394-017-1513-0.
  9. Haddad EH, Gaban-Chong N, Oda K, et al. Effect of a walnut meal on postprandial oxidative stress and antioxidants in healthy individuals. Nutr J. 2014;13:4.View ArticlePubMedPubMed CentralGoogle Scholar
  10. Hu FB, Stampfer MJ, Manson JE, Rimm EB, Colditz GA, Rosner BA, et al. Frequent nut consumption and risk of coronary heart disease in women: prospective cohort study. BMJ. 1998;317(7169):1341–5.View ArticlePubMedPubMed CentralGoogle Scholar
  11. Li Z, Song R, Nguyen C, et al. Pistachio nuts reduce triglycerides and body weight by comparison to refined carbohydrate snack in obese subjects on a 12-week weight loss program. J Am Coll Nutr. 2010;29:198–203.View ArticlePubMedGoogle Scholar
  12. Mattes RD, Dreher ML. Nuts and healthy body weight maintenance mechanisms. Asia Pac J Clin Nutr. 2010;19:137–41.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  13. Mattes RD, Kris-Etherton PM, Foster GD. Impact of peanuts and tree nuts on body weight and healthy weight loss in adults. J Nutr. 2008;138:1741S–5S.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  14. Mohammadifard N, Salehi-Abargouei A, Salas-Salvado J, et al. The effect of tree nut, peanut, and soy nut consumption on blood pressure: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled clinical trials. Am J Clin Nutr. 2015;101:966–82.View ArticlePubMedGoogle Scholar
  15. Natoli S, McCoy P. A review of the evidence: nuts and body weight. Asia Pac J Clin Nutr. 2007;16:588–97.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  16. Neale EP, Tapsell LC, Martin A, et al. Impact of providing walnut samples in a lifestyle intervention for weight loss: a secondary analysis of the HealthTrack trial. Food Nutr Res. 2017;61 doi: 1080/16546628.2017.1344522.
  17. Rock CL, Flatt SW, Barkai HS, et al. A walnut-containing meal had similar effects on early satiety,
  18. Wien MA, Sabate JM, Ikle DN, et al. Almonds vs complex carbohydrates in a weight reduction program. Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 2003;27:1365–72.View ArticlePubMedGoogle Scholar
Read more →

Nuts for weight loss

Nuts for weight loss

Despite the large amount of calories and fat in nuts they are an exceptional food for weight loss. You have already heard me tell you to stop counting calories and worrying about fat. Well here is the best example. Nuts are full of nutrients, including healthy fats, and rate at the top of the list for satiety. A number of studies have found that snacking on nuts helps you stay satiated throughout the day and eat less at meals. Nuts are a great source of protein, essential fats, vitamins and minerals. The fats found in nuts promote efficiency in the utilization of proteins and carbohydrates, as well as aiding in absorption of fat-soluble vitamins. Seeds, like nuts, are nutrient-dense and rich in fibre, a major source of prebiotics to feed the good gut bacteria.

In fact, the consumption of some fats, in particular medium chain triglycerides (found in coconut), has been shown to speed up weight loss. Despite the high fat content in nuts and some fruits like avocados, they don’t contribute to weight gain. In fact studies are now showing, those who consume more nuts are the ones who do not put on weight compared to the low nut consumption groups. This is probably due to eating fewer junk food snacks and the benefits of the nutrients on the body’s metabolism. Raw nuts with no added sugar, salt, oil or any other.

And they are good for you.

For more information on real weight loss based on science and my proven program over 20 years go to

https://www.drdingle.com/collections/frontpage/products/unlock-your-genes-for-weight-loss

Here are some references

  1. Abazarfard Z, Salehi M, Keshavarzi S. The effect of almonds on anthropometric measurements and lipid profile in overweight and obese females in a weight reduction program: a randomized controlled clinical trial. J Res Med Sci. 2014;19:457–64.PubMedPubMed CentralGoogle Scholar
  2. Afshin A, Micha R, Khatibzadeh S, Mozaffarian D. Consumption of nuts and legumes and risk of incident ischemic heart disease, stroke, and diabetes: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Am J Clin Nutr. 2014;100:278–88.View ArticlePubMedPubMed CentralGoogle Scholar
  3. Bao Y, Han J, Hu FB, Giovannucci EL, Stampfer MJ, Willett WC, et al. Association of nut consumption with total and cause-specific mortality. N Engl J Med. 2013;369:2001–11.View ArticlePubMedPubMed CentralGoogle Scholar
  4. Bes-Rastrollo M, Wedick NM, Martinez-Gonzalez MA, et al. Prospective study of nut consumption, long-term weight change, and obesity risk in women. Am J Clin Nutr. 2009;89:1913–9.View ArticlePubMedPubMed CentralGoogle Scholar
  5. Brennan AM, Sweeney LL, Liu X, Mantzoros CS. Walnut consumption increases satiation but has no effect on insulin resistance or the metabolic profile over a 4-day period. Obesity. 2010;18:1176–82.View ArticlePubMedGoogle Scholar
  6. Del Gobbo LC, Falk MC, Feldman R, et al. Effects of tree nuts on blood lipids, apolipoproteins, and blood pressure: systematic review, meta-analysis, and dose-response of 61 controlled intervention trials. Am J Clin Nutr. 2015;102:1347–56.View ArticlePubMedPubMed CentralGoogle Scholar
  7. Foster GD, Shantz KL, Vander Veur SS, et al. A randomized trial of the effects of an almond-enriched, hypocaloric diet in the treatment of obesity. Am J Clin Nutr. 2012;96:249–54.View ArticlePubMedPubMed CentralGoogle Scholar
  8. Freisling H, Noh H, Slimani N, et al. Nut intake and 5-year changes in body weight and obesity risk in adults: results from the EPIC-PANACEA study. Eur J Nutr. 2017; doi: 1007/s00394-017-1513-0.
  9. Haddad EH, Gaban-Chong N, Oda K, et al. Effect of a walnut meal on postprandial oxidative stress and antioxidants in healthy individuals. Nutr J. 2014;13:4.View ArticlePubMedPubMed CentralGoogle Scholar
  10. Hu FB, Stampfer MJ, Manson JE, Rimm EB, Colditz GA, Rosner BA, et al. Frequent nut consumption and risk of coronary heart disease in women: prospective cohort study. BMJ. 1998;317(7169):1341–5.View ArticlePubMedPubMed CentralGoogle Scholar
  11. Li Z, Song R, Nguyen C, et al. Pistachio nuts reduce triglycerides and body weight by comparison to refined carbohydrate snack in obese subjects on a 12-week weight loss program. J Am Coll Nutr. 2010;29:198–203.View ArticlePubMedGoogle Scholar
  12. Mattes RD, Dreher ML. Nuts and healthy body weight maintenance mechanisms. Asia Pac J Clin Nutr. 2010;19:137–41.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  13. Mattes RD, Kris-Etherton PM, Foster GD. Impact of peanuts and tree nuts on body weight and healthy weight loss in adults. J Nutr. 2008;138:1741S–5S.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  14. Mohammadifard N, Salehi-Abargouei A, Salas-Salvado J, et al. The effect of tree nut, peanut, and soy nut consumption on blood pressure: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled clinical trials. Am J Clin Nutr. 2015;101:966–82.View ArticlePubMedGoogle Scholar
  15. Natoli S, McCoy P. A review of the evidence: nuts and body weight. Asia Pac J Clin Nutr. 2007;16:588–97.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  16. Neale EP, Tapsell LC, Martin A, et al. Impact of providing walnut samples in a lifestyle intervention for weight loss: a secondary analysis of the HealthTrack trial. Food Nutr Res. 2017;61 doi: 1080/16546628.2017.1344522.
  17. Rock CL, Flatt SW, Barkai HS, et al. A walnut-containing meal had similar effects on early satiety,
  18. Wien MA, Sabate JM, Ikle DN, et al. Almonds vs complex carbohydrates in a weight reduction program. Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 2003;27:1365–72.View ArticlePubMedGoogle Scholar
Read more →

Dr Peter Dingle’s South West WA Wellness Tour

Dr Peter Dingle’s South West WA Wellness Tour

Hope you can make it to one of our talks

Toxic Overload

October 16, 7.00 pm

Harvey

http://tix.yt/toxicoverloadharvey

 

Toxic Overload

October 17, 7.00 pm

Dalyellup

http://tix.yt/toxicoverloaddalyellup

 

Your Gut Health, Microbiome and Probiotics

October 18 2017

Bunbury turf club

Blair Street Bunbury 6230 Australia

7.00-9.00 PM each night

http://tix.yt/gutmicrobiomeprobioticsbunbury

 

7 Steps To Permanent Weight Loss 

October 19 2017

Bunbury turf club

Blair Street Bunbury 6230 Australia

7.00-9.00 PM each night

http://tix.yt/weightlossbunbury

 

Toxic Overload

October 20, 9.30 am

Leshenault

http://tix.yt/toxicoverloadleshanaultam

 

Toxic Overload

October 20, 7.00 pm

Leshenault

http://tix.yt/toxicoverloadleshanaultpm

 

 

Toxic Overload

October 23, 7.00-9.00 pm

Dunsborough

http://tix.yt/toxicoverloaddunsborougham

 

 

Toxic Overload

October 24, 9.30 -11.30 am

Dunsborough

http://tix.yt/toxicoverloaddunsboroughpm

 

 

Your Gut Health, Microbiome and Probiotics

October 24, 2017

Dunsborough

St George Community Care 48 Gibney Street

 http://tix.yt/gut-healthprobioticsdunsborough

 

Albany

Dog Rock Motel seminar room

303 Middleton Road Mount Clarence 6330

7.00-9.00 PM each night

 

October 26, 2017

Your Gut Health, Microbiome and Probiotics

http://tix.yt/gutmicrobiomeprobioticsalbany

 

October 27 2017

Dangerous Beauty. The toxic truth about cosmetics and personal care products

http://tix.yt/dangerousbeautyalbany

 

October 28 2017

The 7 steps to permanent weight loss

http://tix.yt/weightlossalbany

 

Toxic Overload

We are now surrounded by long list of modern day toxic chemicals in our homes and the personal care products that are impacting on our health.  These poisons and potions are playing their role in making us sick and are linked with the increase in disease like breast cancer, hormone imbalances, thyroid problems and even infertility. Even at “so called” normal levels these chemicals contribute to diseases such as fatigue, depression, stress and anxiety and are linked with diabetes, cardio vascular disease, cancer, estrogen and hormone havoc and weight gain.

This presentation will change your attitudes to many things around you and your home, how you clean and what you put on your skin and empower you to make some simple changes to improve your health. We’ll show you that with a few simple modifications you can easily improve the health status of your home, your wellbeing and that of your family.

 

Gut Health, Microbiome and Probiotics.

Probiotics and a healthy microbiome in our digestive tract is now recognised as one of the most critical conditions for our health and wellbeing. While it is obvious when it comes to many digestive disorders recent research has shown it can be involved in virtually every form of chronic illness. A study in 2016 for example confirmed that up to 50% of Parkinson’s disease can be related to an unhealthy gut microbiome. While many skin conditions like eczema, psoriasis and even acne as well as Alzheimer’s, MS, allergies, diabetes type 1 and 2 and high blood pressure are all related to a healthy gut. Even weight gain and weight loss is influenced by your gut microbiome. Both directly and indirectly a healthy gut can determine how healthy you are and even how much weight you put on. However, a healthy gut is determined by many more factors than just supplementing with probiotics or eating yoghurt.

In this one night presentation you will learn about the importance of gut health as well as what steps you can take to improve. This night is a must to see.

 

7 Steps To Permanent Weight Loss 

Diets, counting calories and low fat foods don’t work because they are working against your genes. These diets are going against millions of years of evolution. Studies on these types of diets show impaired mental performance, poor immediate memory and slower reaction times, they lose more muscle and develop metabolic and immune system disorders. Even more disturbing people on these diets lose muscle, end up putting on more weight and die younger.

The reason is that these Diets focus on the wrong thing. They ignore the genetic, biochemical and nutritional needs of your body so they can never succeed.

Learn the secrets of weight loss and the language of talking to your genes. Learn to retune your genes to lose extra kilos of weight without dieting.

Dr Dingle will show you by focusing on nutrient dense foods, supplementation, the right protein foods, probiotics and eliminating toxins you can unlock your genes for weight loss and wellbeing without dieting and exercise.

 

Dangerous Beauty. The toxic truth about cosmetics and personal care products

(Albany Only)

The personal care and cosmetic products you use directly influence the health of your family. These products impact their hormone levels and thyroid function and are linked with weight gain. These chemicals are linked with Estrogen overload and hormone imbalances, Breast and prostate cancer, Thyroid dysfunction and hypothyroidism, Impaired immune system, Skin ageing, infertility and testosterone in males and so much more.

Most Personal care products contain parabens, phthalates, solvents, mineral oils and other hormone disrupting chemicals and you won’t even know it because they may be a “secret ingredient” or even formaldehyde hidden under another name.

We now know that many of these toxic chemicals pass through the skin and into the blood where they can accumulate and cause damage and can pass into the placenta and accumulate in breast tissue.

Every application increases the risk and exposure and of greatest concern is that it is young women and girls who are most exposed to these toxins. But no one is exempt. Even girls of 5 and 6 are showing up with high concentrations of these toxins.

The good news is that by learning a little bit and avoiding these chemicals and making a few simple changes to your lives you can make a big difference to the health of your family. Your choices today have the power to affect fertility, breast cancer and weight gain even for the next few generations.

At this presentation you will find out what you can do to protect your family health, what to avoid and what is ok.

Dr Peter Dingle PhD

Exploding old belief systems, Dr Dingle dispels myths and confusion around health and how to create long lasting wellbeing. He puts the real facts at your fingertips, then provides you with personalised options to ensure your choices get you the best out of your future.

Nobody knows wellness like Dr Peter Dingle, Australia’s most engaging and innovative thought leader on the topics of health, wellness and weight loss who presents cutting-edge science in a bold, courageous, humourous and straight-shooting manner.

Dr Dingle is Australia's most popular and qualified professional speaker. He holds 2 Degrees in Science and a PhD, 21 years as an academic at Murdoch University and written 15 books on health and wellness.

Dr Dingle has a unique ability to entertain, educate and involve simultaneously. A natural entertainer, Dr D transports delighted audiences on a journey of truth and laughter that will empower them to optimize energy and health, find better life balance and their health

Dr Peter Dingle is known both in Australia and around the world as one of the most impactful and engaging thought leaders in the Health and Wellness Movement.  Over the last 30 Years he has helped hundreds of thousands of people better their lives by cutting through medical and health myths to give the real facts on evidence-based wellness.

 

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Men also exposed to chemicals from Personal care products (PCPs). New study

Men also exposed to chemicals from Personal care products (PCPs). New study

In this study of four hundred men 83% percent increase in monoethyl phthalate (MEP) was associated with use of cologne/perfume and 74% for deodorant. While the largest percent increase for parabens, between 66 and 156% was associated with the use of suntan/sunblock lotion and a 79–147% for hand/body lotions. Increases in MEP and parabens were generally greater with PCP use within 6 h of urine collection. A 6 hour period after application of the PCP lead to at least 70% of the weighted score and predicted a 254–1,333% increase in MEP and parabens concentrations.

Previous studies have shown a cyclical pattern of rise and decline suggestive of ongoing repeated nonfood exposures including monoethyl phthalate increasing after showers, which suggested PCPs as a major source of DEP exposure.

Phthalates are a family of chemicals commonly used as plasticizers in polyvinyl chloride plastics and in consumer products, including personal care products (PCPs), medications, and food processing and packaging materials. However, studies suggest the major phthalate and paraben exposure comes from personal care producs and cosmetics, up to 50 times more for parabens in women than diet. Diethyl phthalate (DEP) is the most commonly used phthalate in PCPs. Parabens are a family of chemicals with antimicrobial preservative properties that are also widely used in PCPs, pharmaceuticals, food, and beverages to increase the shelf life of the product. Methylparaben, propylparaben, and butylparaben are most commonly used in PCPs.

A number of studies have also shown now that that urinary concentrations of the parabens are lower when the participants are given products without parabens and phthalates.

Exposure to phthalates and parabens from PCP use occurs through direct dermal application or even transdermal exposure from air.

The phthalates and parabens are endocrine disruptors and have been linked to adverse health outcomes including male infertility.

Source: https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP1374

https://www.drdingle.com/products/dangerous-beauty-1

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The Essential Sleep (Part 1)

The Essential Sleep (Part 1)

In today’s busy and hectic society many see sleep as a luxury rather than what it is – a necessity.  More and more people are working overtime, and shift work trying to juggle a busy family life around their work.  Along with this, it is not unusual for both parents to be working full time.  The advent of our 24/7 society has pushed regular sleep to the side. Because of this, many men and women (and even children) wrongly consider sleep a waste of time. 

Sleep is an essential element of the human body, without it we cannot survive. Getting enough sleep is associated with energy, joy, optimistic thinking and coping with negative emotions. Despite this almost 90 percent of Australians suffer from some type sleep disorder at some stage of their lives.  Of these, 30 percent suffer from severe sleep disorders.  Very few people regularly enjoy the amount or quality of sleep that they need.  The estimated economic costs to the country from this are between $3 billion and $7 billion annually.  There are also huge, unmeasured physical, psychological, emotional and social costs. 

Sleep is complicated in the way that there are many different factors that influence the effectiveness of sleep. It’s not just duration that determines the effectiveness of said sleep, factors such as quality, frame of mind and deepness all contribute to the maximum desired outcome and even our perception of how we sleep. Many factors can play a part in the quality and quantity of our sleep and to maximise our sleep time an understanding of this is essential.     

On average a healthy person will spend around one third of their life sleeping (Duman et al, 2009).  Sleep is considered a natural periodic state of rest for the mind and body, in which the eyes will usually close and consciousness is completely or partially lost resulting in a decrease in bodily movements and responsiveness to external stimuli (Blanch et al, 2009). Inadequate hours of good quality sleep leads to a disruption to vital biological processes resulting in a decrease in cognitive function mental and physical health (Anderson et al, 2009) including impaired work performance due to a decrease in attention, judgement and responsible decision making (Volkow, 2009). 

Why we sleep

Mammals are naturally diurnal animals and sleep for humans are broken into two distinct phases. These phases, Non Rapid Eye Movement (NREM) and Rapid Eye Movement (REM), represent the depth of sleep and electrical activity in the central nervous system (CNS) (Cirelli & Tononi, 2008). However, sleep is a heightened anabolic state where rejuvenation of many organ systems occurs, especially the immune and nervous systems. NREM is further broken into phases one to three during which have different waves of sleep and cognitive perceptions, phase one for example is associated with hyper‑CNS responses. During this phase the body may quickly jerk out of steep and this will be felt as a falling sensation (Walsh, 2009). Various genetic mutations have been associated with sleep including DEC2 mutations that lower the sleep requirement from eight hours to six and the 600072 prion gene that predisposes to Fatal Familial Insomnia (Kniff in, 2009; McKusick and Kniffin, 2009). The natural circadian rhythms of the body are a result of variations in levels of circulating melatonin hormone, from the pineal gland, and also adenosine levels which increase over the course of the day (Imeri & Opp, 2009).

Among the theories on why humans sleep, scientists have proposed the following:

Sleep may be a way of recharging the brain. The brain has a chance to shut down and repair neurons and to exercise important neuronal connections that might otherwise deteriorate due to lack of activity or over activity.

Sleep gives the brain an opportunity to reorganize data to help find a solution to problem, process newly learned information and organize and archive memories.

Sleep lowers a person’s metabolic rate and energy consumption.

The cardiovascular system also gets a break during sleep. People with normal or high blood pressure experience a 20 to 30% reduction in blood pressure and 10 to 20% reduction in heart rate.

During sleep, the body has a chance to replace chemicals and repair muscles, other tissues and aging or dead cells.

In children and young adults, growth hormones are released during deep sleep (World Federation of Sleep Research and Sleep Medicine Societies

Immune function is highest when we sleep

Detoxing. There appear to be “hidden caves” inside the brain, which open up during sleep, allowing cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) to flush out potential neurotoxins, like β-amyloid, which has been associated with Alzheimer’s disease. The research discovered “hidden caves” inside the brain, which open up during sleep, allowing cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) to flush out potential neurotoxins, like β-amyloid, which has been associated with Alzheimer’s disease. The interstitial spaces in the mouse’s brain took up only 14% of the brain’s volume while it was awake. Yet, while it slept, this increased by almost two-thirds to take up fully 23% of the brain’s total volume. The effect is that potential neurotoxins, like β-amyloid, are cleared twice as fast during sleep as during waking. While many neurological diseases, like strokes and dementia, are associated with problems sleeping. It could be that lack of sleep, and restriction of the brain’s cleaning system, may cause toxic metabolites to building up, leading to long-term damage.

Most likely we sleep for a combination of these reasons

 

Part 2 and more coming

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Essential Sleep (Part 8). Sleep and the immune system

Essential Sleep (Part 8). Sleep and the immune system

Sleep, like most other processes in our body, is mediated by the interaction of cytokines and chemokines with neurotransmitters (Dilger & Johnson, 2008). During infection our sleep patterns change and interactions of cytokines, especially IL‑1 and IL‑1 2 and the neurotransmitter serotonin amplify (Dantzer et al. 2008; Lange et at. 2006). During sleep, it has been suggested that, the synapses not used during the day's activities are given an opportunity to prime and regenerate, cognitive function also rejuvenates, memories are consolidated and on a cellular level glycogen stores can re‑fuel. However, sleep deprivation has been associated with inflammatory based diseases including obesity, Cardiovascular Disease and Diabetes (lmeri & Opp, 2009).

 

Sleep deprivation has been shown to further enhance end stage renal disease, decrease vaccine efficacy as attested with both Influenza and Hepatits A vaccines, prolong wound healing, lengthen critical care stays and enhance depression or other psychiatric disorders (Lange et al. 2003; Miller et al. 2004; Koch et al. 2009).

Several recent studies report that reducing sleep to 6.5 or fewer hours for successive nights causes potentially harmful metabolic, hormonal and immune changes.  All of the changes are similar to those detected in the normal aging process (Cobb, 2002) and so sleep deprivation could be the biggest indicator of how long you live (Sateia, et al., 2004).  There is a strong link between sleep deprivation and low immune system function (Redwine, et al., 2003).  A reduction of sleep makes people more prone to infection and potentially more prone to cancer; one study found that poor sleep was associated with a 60 percent increase in breast cancer. 

In one study of 153 volunteers who spent less time in bed, or who spent their time in bed tossing and turning instead of snoozing, were much more likely to catch a cold when viruses were dripped into their noses, while those who slept longer and more soundly resisted infection better. The study showed that even relatively minor sleep disturbances can influence the body's reaction to cold viruses ( Cohen et al  Archives of Internal Medicine). The men and women who reported fewer than seven hours of sleep on average were 2.94 times more likely to develop sneezing, sore throat and other cold symptoms than those who reported getting eight or more hours of sleep each night. Volunteers who spent less than 92 percent of their time in bed asleep were 5 1/2 times more likely to become ill than better sleepers, they found.

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