Dr Dingle's Blog / diabetes

Inflammation increses your risk of heart disease (and everything else)

Inflammation increses your risk of heart disease (and everything else)

Chronic inflammation is known to play a major role in the development of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) and related mortality. Various dietary components also have been implicated in playing a major role in the development of various CVDs and research has shown that whole diet and various dietary components have a direct association with inflammation. Consumption of fruit and vegetables has been shown to reduce levels of inflammation. Increased adherence to healthier dietary patterns characterized by increased intake of plant-based foods such as fruit and vegetables, nuts, and whole grains and adherence to a healthier dietary pattern has been shown to help prevent and to manage CVD. An increased intake of polyphenols, anti-oxidants with ability to decreases oxidative stress and inflammation through scavenging free radicals, found in fruits, vegetables and nuts, has also shown to be associated with decreased risk of overall and CVD-related mortality.

While consumption of red meat has been shown to increase inflammation. In a recent meta-analysis, increased intake of processed meat has been shown to be associated with increased risk of CVD mortality.

The Dietary Inflammatory Index (DII) has also been shown to be associated with various chronic inflammation-related health outcomes such as cancer incidence, all-cause and cancer-specific mortality, respiratory conditions such as asthma and cognitive disorders. A recent meta-analysis from nine studies found individuals in the highest versus the lowest DII category showed an overall 40% increased risk of colorectal cancer.

In this study data from 14 studies showed a 36% increase in the risk of CVD between the highest and lowest DII scores and there was an increased risk of CVD risk and mortality of 8% for each one-point increase in the DII score.

Results of this meta-analysis support the importance of adopting a healthier anti-inflammatory diet for preventing CVD incidence and related mortality and a pro-inflammatory diet is associated with increased risk of CVD and CVD mortality.

We are running a course on Inflammation, the DII and inflammation for other aspects of our environment and lifestyle to celebrate the release of our new book "Overcoming Illness" which explains all the information behind inflammation and oxidation and how to reduce your risk of all chronic illness for Diabetes to Dementia.

Overcoming Illness the course

7:00 PM - 9:05 PM Tuesday 6th March 2018

http://tix.yt/overcoming-illness

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Study shows Inflammation causes heart disease and how to lower it

Study shows Inflammation causes heart disease and how to lower it

Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD) such as acute heart atacks and stroke remains the leading cause of death worldwide. Both epidemiological and clinical studies have shown a strong link between inflammation, such as C-reactive protein (CRP), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and interleukin (IL)-6, and the risk of cardiovascular events. Studies have also shown a strong link with inflammation and insulin resistance, an important determinant of CVD and diabetes.

So it all comes down to inflammation

In this study they investigated the link between inflammation insulin resistance and fat consumption and found insulin resistance linked with inflammation (hs-CRP and IL-6) and these inflammatory biomarkers were positively associated with saturated fatty acids and negatively associated with unsaturated fatty acids and monounsaturated fats. Dietary components, especially fatty acids, affect the expression and release of inflammatory biomarkers. Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), such as eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), have a cardioprotective effect by reducing inflammation. Indeed, clinical studies have shown that diets may have effect on inflammatory biomarkers.

What does this mean?

One step to lower you inflammation and risk of CVD the major killer in in the world (and all chronic illness if you read my work) is to increase your omega 3 fatty acid and lower some of your saturated fats. There are many other ways to lower your inflammation and risk of chronic disease including lifestyle and dietary changes.

 

source

https://nutritionj.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12937-018-0342-1

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Another study shows artificial sweeteners help put on weight

Another study shows artificial sweeteners help put on weight

Advice on the artificial sweeteners are constantly dolled out to people from well meaning nutritionists, diabetic and heart associations around the world without looking at the science.

Weight loss is not just about calories in and calories out it is about the quality of the food and how your body uses it to its advantage or not. If it were just the balance between the calories then low fat, low calorie and artificial sweeteners would all work but hey don't. As yet another big study shows.

This study from the University of Manitoba in Canada brought the information together from 37 different studies and found people who consume artificial sweeteners weren't losing weight, and the longer studies which observed people for up to 10 years found they were putting on weight. Consumption of nonnutritive sweeteners was associated with increases in weight and waist circumference, and higher incidence of obesity, hypertension, metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular events compared to others who weren't using sweeteners.

While there is no doubt sugar consumption is fueling the global obesity epidemic epidemic it seems these non nutritive artificial sweeteners are also stoking this fire. Research which I have written about extensively in my book "Unlock Your Genes For Weight Loss" (https://www.drdingle.com/collections/book-sales/products/unlock-your-genes-for-weight-loss) has now shown these nonnutritive sweeteners paradoxically help put on weight even without any extra calories. And have have been shown to adverse effects on glucose metabolism, gut microbiota and appetite control and animal studies have shown that chronic exposure to nonnutritive sweeteners leads to increased food consumption, weight gain and adiposity.

Despite this overwhelming a evidence the position of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics is that nonnutritive sweeteners can help limit energy intake as a strategy to manage weight or blood glucose.

In our courses and our book we show the science behind weight loss is about the quality of the food you eat not the calories. Certain foods talk to you genes to get you to put on weight while other foods help you lose weight and regain your health.

http://tix.yt/permanentweightloss

 Source

http://www.cmaj.ca/content/189/28/E929

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Inflammation food and cardio vascular disease.

Inflammation food and cardio vascular disease.

All chronic illness including cancers, osteoporosis, cardiovascular disease and renal disease and more are linked through inflammation which is described in my latest book "Overcoming Illness". Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is one of the most common causes of morbidity and mortality in different communities accounting for more than 31% or 17.5 million deaths worldwide.

In this study of 454 patients aged 35-80 years a high dietary inflammatory Index (DII- higher inflammation producing in the foods they eat) scores were associated with higher age, higher prevalence of diabetes and myocardial infarction (MI- heart attack) and lower educational attainment. Male patients in top half of DII had significantly higher total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG), albumin, creatinine, BUN and hs-CRP concentrations and lower high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL) concentrations compared with male patients in lower half. While in female patients, only lipoprotein (a) concentrations and hematocrit (HCT) percentage in the 4th and 2nd quartile were significantly higher than lower quartiles.

The results clearly show a positive association with the inflammation level in foods and several cardiovascular risk factors. The higher inflammatory potential of diet denoted higher values of serum lipids, CRP and kidney function tests.

Current evidence supports that inflammation is a major driving force in patients with coronary artery disease, underlying the initiation of coronary plaques, their unstable progression, and eventual disruption. The pro-inflammatory nature of the cardiovascular disease can be explained by this fact that almost in all of the atherosclerosis processes inflammatory molecules are involved

Diet and dietary habits play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease and dietary habits are potential determinants of the disease severity. The role of dietary factors and nutritional regimens in the prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and its progression has been extensively studied; numerous reports suggested the role of healthy dietary choices and improved life style with higher physical activity level and higher intakes of healthy foods including fruits and vegetables and dietary antioxidants in prevention and treatment of cardiovascular event.

 

Source

https://nutritionj.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12937-018-0325-2

Overcoming Illness is the book that explains all about inflammation and oxidation, their link with chronic illness and how to lower inflammation to improve your health and overcome illness.

https://www.drdingle.com/collections/frontpage/products/overcoming-illness-pre-order

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Positive attitude decreases the risk of dementia by 50%

Positive attitude decreases the risk of dementia by 50%

One of the strongest risk factors for dementia is the ε4 variant of the APOE gene. One quarter of the population carries the ε4 variant of the APOE gene, which is one of the strongest risk factors for dementia. Yet, many who carry it never develop dementia. This study examined perceptions about various aspects of old age, reduces the risk of dementia for APOE ε4 carriers as well as older individuals in general.

In this study of 4,765 Health and Retirement Study participants who were aged 60 or older and dementia-free at the beginning. Among those with APOE ε4, those with positive age beliefs were 49.8% less likely to develop dementia than those with negative age beliefs. The results of this study suggest that positive age beliefs, which are modifiable and have been found to reduce stress, can act as a protective factor, even for older individuals at high risk of dementia.

Considerable research has found that positive age beliefs predict better cognitive performance; whereas, negative age beliefs predict worse cognitive performance. The pattern of age beliefs predicting cognition has been supported many studies, together with three meta-analyses. Further, a recent study found that negative age beliefs predicted the development of Alzheimer’s disease biomarkers.

Short- and long-term randomized controlled interventions conducted with older participants have shown that positive age beliefs can be bolstered and negative age beliefs can be mitigated with corresponding changes in cognitive and physical performance.

Recent studies found that negative age beliefs can exacerbate stress; in contrast, positive age beliefs can help buffer against the deleterious effects of stress. While another set of studies suggests that stress can contribute to the development of dementia.

However, underlying all this is inflammation and oxidation. The increased negative attitude leads to increased stress which leads to increased inflammation and oxidation which leads to increased dementia. Stop the downward cycle by lowering the inflammation and bolstering the positive thoughts.

The reduction of stress by positive age beliefs could potentially contribute to a lower incidence of dementia among older individuals in general and specifically among those with APOE ε4.

source

Levy BR, Slade MD, Pietrzak RH, Ferrucci L (2018) Positive age beliefs protect against dementia even among elders with high-risk gene. PLoS ONE 13(2): e0191004. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0191004

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Weight gain is not in the genes. It is in what you do to the genes

Weight gain is not in the genes. It is in what you do to the genes

Genetic determinism—that is, the notion that “it’s all in the genes,” that everything is determined by our DNA and that we are victims of our hereditary—is just not right. You and your conditions, including weight gain and obesity, are not determined by your DNA. In studies of separated twins of obese parents, children growing up in a thin family are more likely to grow up thin. If they grow up in an overweight family they are more likely to be overweight. It appears that while genes have a role in weight gain, it is the passing on of eating habits that are more important.

In recent years, a new idea has come to the forefront of genetics and is the focus of thousands of studies: epigenetics. It is now understood that obesity and weight gain and all the chronic diseases are linked to epigenetic triggers. The vast majority of conditions leading to weight gain are a result of complex interactions between genes and the environment; these interactions cannot be explained by classic genetics.

It is true that the genes we are born with may have an association with weight gain and disease, but this does not prove causation. The truth is only a very small number of people have “smoking gun” genes which predispose them to obesity, diabetes and heart disease. Although heritability is considered to be a major risk factor for weight gain and obesity, the almost 40 candidate genes identified by gene studies (GWAS) so far account for only five percent to 10% of the observed variance in body mass index in human subjects. Other research suggests that heredity may be responsible for less than one percent of the obesity crisis. All the genes combined explain a maximum of 0.9% of variation in human body mass index. So, if it’s not in the genes…

 

It’s all in the EPIgenes

Epigenetics provides the missing link between our environment and weight gain as well as all the chronic illnesses we suffer. Your genes are always responding, in good or bad ways, to what you eat, environmental toxins, your emotions, your stresses and your experiences, and to the nutritional microenvironment within each of your body’s cells. Environmental factors are capable of causing epigenetic changes in DNA that can potentially alter gene expression and result in weight gain and obesity or the opposite. Environmental influences—including nutrition, behaviour, chemicals, radiation and even stress and emotions—can silence or activate a gene without altering the genetic code in any way. These changes in gene expression, the so-called “turning on” of a gene, occur without any change to the DNA sequence.

Each nutrient, each interaction, each experience can therefore manifest itself through biochemical changes, which may have effects at birth or 40 years down the track, or even in the next generation or two. Some of the most well known studies linking epigenetics and obesity have involved the “Agouti” mice. A short-term dietary intervention in pregnant agouti mice, in the form of supplements of folic acid, vitamin B12, choline and betaine, has shown long lasting beneficial influences on the health and appearance of the offspring for multiple generations. The mice that did not get the nutritional supplementation became obese and developed the equivalent of metabolic syndrome and diabetes.

The GOOD news is that, while epigenetic changes can lead to an increase in weight gain and obesity, understanding epigenetics puts us in control. Not only can we avoid outcomes that were once thought of as “in our genes,” but also research is showing that, by changing our diet and lifestyle, we can reverse many of these conditions. Just as the genes for weight gain can be turned on, they can also—with the right information and actions—be turned off. Numerous studies have shown that changing our diet, lifestyle and environment alters our DNA. We are now in control.

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Understanding weight gain

Understanding weight gain

Weight gain is not just a fluke; it is a symptom of Western diet and lifestyle—our thoughts and actions being out of balance with our genetics and evolution. As incredible as this may sound, the ability to modify behaviour of your genes to influence weight loss is a key concept in this book. Epigenetics is the scientific field that looks at how genes interact with our diet, environment, lifestyle and even emotions, to change the expression of our genes for better or worse—and in the case of weight gain, for worse.

In a very real sense, everything that happens in our bodies ultimately takes place on a genetic level. Nothing happens without the genes being involved, either directly or indirectly. And the way our genes are programmed is largely a product of our environment and our evolution. A large body of research clearly shows that good health, abundant energy and weight management all rely on the normal functioning of genes which, in turn, depends on a healthy environment, diet and lifestyle. The research also shows that you can improve your weight and health, regardless of the genes with which you are born. You are not stuck with genes that make you gain weight.

Many of today’s health problems result from what amounts to a collision between ancient genetics and modern, highly processed foods. Our genes are routinely exposed to genetically unfamiliar foods and chemicals, and they respond abnormally, such as by triggering inflammation, chronic illness, low energy and weight gain. We evolved in a rich environment full of nutrient-dense foods and only the stress of the hunt—a very different scenario than our lives today. In times past, every calorie consumed came with large amounts of vitamins, minerals, proteins and healthy fats, relatively little starch and almost no grain. Many ancient diets were extraordinarily diverse, including up to a hundred different types of plant foods, as well as scores of land animals, many species of fish and wild bird eggs.

Today, we are living out of balance, and paying the price. It doesn’t take much to put on extra weight. Even small disturbances in energy balance may lead to the onset of obesity.

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Paleo diet good for weight loss in older women

Paleo diet good for weight loss in older women

The weight loss, low calorie, low fat don't eat anything nice diets have never worked for weight loss. In fact they can boomerang and cause muscle loss and weight gain. Postmenopausal women have an increased risk of obesity, for instance due to the reduction of oestrogen production in combination with an elevated energy intake and reduced physical activity.

The Paleo diet allows people to eat plenty of unsaturated fats and low-glycaemic carbohydrates—the ones that are lower in sugar—and specifically focuses on vegetables, lean meats, fish, poultry, eggs, shellfish, seeds, nuts and fruits, and excludes all grains and cereals, milk, refined sugars and added salt.

In this study of 70 overweight post-menopausal were either put on the Paleo diet or the Nordic Nutrition Recommendations diet, which is like the Paleo but allows cereals and grains, milk, refined sugars and added salt.Over the two years, women on the Paleo diet lost an average of nine kilos (20 lbs) while those following the Nordic diet lost an average of six kilos (13 lbs). But the biggest difference was the overall health of the Paleo-group women. They saw levels of risk factors of type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular diseases and enzymes involved in fat storage decrease. The weight loss in both dietary groups also contributed to reduced inflammation in both fat tissue and in the circulation which is the major cause of chronic illness. (https://www.drdingle.com/collections/frontpage/products/overcoming-illness-pre-order)

The good news is the women had "free reign" about the amount of food they could eat as long as it followed the guidelines.


“In conclusion, the study shows that the Paleolithic diet with a high

proportion of unsaturated fats was healthier for this group of women, even if the Nordic Nutrition Recommendations also had positive health effects,” says Caroline Blomquist.

Source. http://www.medfak.umu.se/english/about-the-faculty/news/newsdetailpage/paleolithic-diet-healthier-for-overweight-women.cid289548

Our next "7 steps to Permanent Weight Loss" is on Tuesday February 27 in North Perth. http://tix.yt/permanentweightloss

 

Learn

Why diets or exercise programs don't work

The role of hormones

7 simple steps to weight loss.

Which foods work best

The importance of...

But it is much more than the paleo

 

 

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An apple a day to lower inflammation beats statin drugs.

An apple a day to lower inflammation beats statin drugs.

I have been researching and writing on cholesterol and statin drugs for more than 10 years and millions of people still take them. Cholesterol is not the killer it is inflammation, oxidation and acidosis. No one has ever died from cholesterol. It is associated with CVD but not the cause. So if you lower cholesterol you do not lower the risk of CVD more than 1%.

The statin drugs are at best ineffective but in reality are dangerous. The real cause of heart attacks and strokes, Cardiovascular disease is inflammation and oxidation. If you want to lower your risk of these conditions lower your inflammation, oxidation and acidosis.

In support of this a recent study out of Oxford University showed that one apple a day out performs the statin drugs without the side effects of diabetes, muscle disease, dementia and other serous side effects.

Using mathematical modelling, the researchers say that eating an apple a day could prevent 8,500 deaths from heart disease every year if 70 per cent of the total population of over-50s ate one, compared to 9,400 saved lives if everyone took a statin.

Source: BMJ, 2013; 347: f7267. A statin a day keeps the doctor away: comparative proverb assessment modelling study. BMJ 2013; 347 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.f7267

While another study in the Journal of Functional Foods back in 2012 found the consumption of just one apple/day for 4 weeks drastically lowered plasma concentrations of oxidized low-density lipoprotein and showed that an easily accomplished dietary intervention had a major effect on an atherosclerosis risk factor, in part via polyphenols. (http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jff.2012.08.010)

Unlike stain drugs apples are full of nutrients that lower inflammation and your risk of all forms of chronic illness.

Apples are rich in polyphenols, which provide antioxidant  and anti inflammatory properties and modulation of gut microbiota.

Cholesterol is not the killer it is inflammation.

For information on inflammation and how to lower it

https://www.drdingle.com/collections/frontpage/products/overcoming-illness-pre-order

 

 

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Diabetes inflammation

Diabetes inflammation

Diabetes type 2 is just a symptom of a diseased lifestyle. It is probably our body’s mechanism to store food in times of food shortages (which we needed as hunter-gatherers when food shortage was a frequent occurrence). Now we have too much of the wrong food all of the time. The signs and symptoms of diabetes, including thirst and fatigue, are just messages to tell us to change. If we don’t change then we develop insulin resistance, which tells us that we already have too much food (energy) stored in the cell and to stop sending in the sugar. By this time we may have spent 10 or 20 years not listening to the body’s messages. Under normal conditions, our cells take the sugar out of the blood to provide us with the energy our cells need to function. If the sugar remains in the bloodstream, it causes damage to the blood and to cells in the blood. But when there is too much energy stored in the cells, the cells stop taking the sugar in, because we just can’t use any more. Blood sugar levels are also one of the best predictors of dementia later in life.

Although inflammation, oxidation and acidosis (IOA) are natural and essential for a healthy body, they can be seriously problematic if they become chronic and reoccurring as a result of our body being out of balance. Recent studies have established that the three conditions combined are a leading pathogenic force in the development of chronic diseases—including diabetes, cancers, cardiovascular disease, autoimmune diseases (including asthma and arthritis), osteoporosis, multiple sclerosis, dementia and even depression, obesity and premature ageing.

In modern medicine, we treat the condition that occurs down the line, such as diabetes, by giving the person blood-sugar-lowering drugs. This lowers the blood sugar but does not treat the condition that is causing the diabetic problem. The problem is not high levels of sugar in the blood; it is the damage that has been done, often over decades, by poor diet and lifestyle that have led to chronic inflammation, oxidation and acidosis, the combination of which eventually results in high blood sugar. High blood sugar is just the symptom; the damage is in the cells—in our powerhouse called the mitochondria—and is the result of inflammation, oxidation and acidosis.

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