Dr Dingle's Blog / blood sugar

Fasting reverses Type 2 diabetes

Fasting reverses Type 2 diabetes

Despite what we are often told the overwhelming evidence shows that Type 2 diabetes is a diet and lifestyle illness. It also shows that when you reverse the conditions that caused it the disease is also reversible.

Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a chronic disease closely linked to the epidemic of obesity that requires long-term medical attention to limit the development of its wide range of complications. Many of these complications arise from the combination of resistance to insulin action, inadequate insulin secretion, and excessive or inappropriate glucagon secretion. Approximately 10% of the population of the USA and Canada have a diagnosis of T2D, and the morbidity and mortality rates associated with it are fairly high. The economic burden of T2D in the USA is $245 billion and around $20 billion in Australia.

This case documents three patients referred to the Intensive Dietary Management clinic in Toronto, Canada, for insulin-dependent type 2 diabetes. It demonstrates the effectiveness of therapeutic fasting to reverse their insulin resistance, resulting in cessation of insulin therapy while maintaining control of their blood sugars. In addition, these patients were also able to lose significant amounts of body weight, reduce their waist circumference and also reduce their glycated haemoglobin level.

These three cases exemplify that therapeutic fasting may reduce insulin requirements in T2D. Given the rising cost of insulin, patients may potentially save significant money. Further, the reduced need for syringes and blood glucose monitoring may reduce patient discomfort.

Therapeutic fasting has the potential to fill this gap in diabetes care by providing similar intensive caloric restriction and hormonal benefits as bariatric surgery without the invasive and dangerous surgery. During fasting periods, patients are allowed to drink unlimited amounts of very low-calorie fluids such as water, coffee, tea and bone broth. A general multivitamin supplement is encouraged to provide adequate micronutrients. Precise fasting schedules vary depending primarily on the patient’s preference, ranging from 16 hours to several days. On eating days, patients are encouraged to eat a diet low in sugar and refined carbohydrates, which decreases blood glucose and insulin secretion.

This means that patients with T2D can reverse their diseases without the worry of side effects and financial burden of many pharmaceuticals, as well as the unknown long-term risks and uncertainty of surgery, all by means of therapeutic fasting.

 

Source http://casereports.bmj.com/content/2018/bcr-2017-221854.full

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A Pecan a day keeps the diabetes and cardiovascular disease away.

A Pecan a day keeps the diabetes and cardiovascular disease away.

A large amount of evidence has shown a high intake of tree nuts is associated with a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), mortality from type 2 diabetes (T2DM), and all-cause mortality.

In this study after 4 weeks on a pecan-rich diet the researchers saw beneficial changes in serum insulin, insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and beta cell function (HOMA-β) as well as cardiometabolic disease. That is a significant reduction in the risk of diabetes2, heart attacks and stroke.

Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are a leading cause of death worldwide, and is primarly caused by inflammation and oxidation. Within the past few decades, there has also been a dramatic increase in diet-related chronic diseases related to CVD risk, i.e., diabetes, obesity, and hypertension, in both industrialized and developing nations. The problem is only getting worse even though we spend more money on pharmaceuticals and the medical system than ever before. Increased production of reactive oxygen species, oxidative stress, and inflammation, are the leading causes of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), arterial hypertension, and dyslipidemia.

A growing body of evidence has shown that a high intake of nuts (all types) is associated with a reduced risk of CVD development, all-cause mortality, and mortality from diabetes. Indeed, a nut-containing diet also contributes to weight control and weight loss despite the large number of calories.

Bioactive compounds present in nuts, include essential fatty acids, vitamins and minerals, fiber, and phytochemicals, have all been shown to reduce inflammation, improving vascular reactivity as well as fasting glucose and insulin sensitivity, and by lowering oxidative stress. Numerous studies have now shown that consumption of nuts is effective in reducing oxidative stress and inflammation. Other studies have shown frequent nut consumption is associated with lower concentrations of inflammation (CRP, IL-6) and some endothelial (the artery lining) markers in clinical trials. In a study of 5,013 participants, a greater intake of nuts was associated with lower amounts of inflammatory biomarkers. Subjects with nut intake of five or more times per week had a 20% nearly 20% reduction in inflammation compared to those who never or almost never consumed nuts. Pistachio nuts, for example, reduce oxidative stress and inflammation. Pistachio kernels have anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties at lower doses than reported previously and decreased inflammation (TNF-α and IL-1β) in a dose-dependent way. That is, the more the participants consumed, the lower the inflammation.

EAT MORE NUTS

But not peanuts and cashews

For much more information on how to reverse diabetes and cardiovascular disease (and all chronic illness) “Overcoming Illness” our latest book is a must read.

https://www.drdingle.com/collections/frontpage/products/overcoming-illness-pre-order

 

Source

A Pecan-Rich Diet Improves Cardiometabolic Risk Factors in Overweight and Obese Adults: A Randomized Controlled Trial

Diane L. McKay 1,*, Misha Eliasziw 2, C. Y. Oliver Chen 1 and Jeffrey B. Blumberg 1http://www.mdpi.com/2072-6643/10/3/339/htm

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Another study shows artificial sweeteners help put on weight

Another study shows artificial sweeteners help put on weight

Advice on the artificial sweeteners are constantly dolled out to people from well meaning nutritionists, diabetic and heart associations around the world without looking at the science.

Weight loss is not just about calories in and calories out it is about the quality of the food and how your body uses it to its advantage or not. If it were just the balance between the calories then low fat, low calorie and artificial sweeteners would all work but hey don't. As yet another big study shows.

This study from the University of Manitoba in Canada brought the information together from 37 different studies and found people who consume artificial sweeteners weren't losing weight, and the longer studies which observed people for up to 10 years found they were putting on weight. Consumption of nonnutritive sweeteners was associated with increases in weight and waist circumference, and higher incidence of obesity, hypertension, metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular events compared to others who weren't using sweeteners.

While there is no doubt sugar consumption is fueling the global obesity epidemic epidemic it seems these non nutritive artificial sweeteners are also stoking this fire. Research which I have written about extensively in my book "Unlock Your Genes For Weight Loss" (https://www.drdingle.com/collections/book-sales/products/unlock-your-genes-for-weight-loss) has now shown these nonnutritive sweeteners paradoxically help put on weight even without any extra calories. And have have been shown to adverse effects on glucose metabolism, gut microbiota and appetite control and animal studies have shown that chronic exposure to nonnutritive sweeteners leads to increased food consumption, weight gain and adiposity.

Despite this overwhelming a evidence the position of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics is that nonnutritive sweeteners can help limit energy intake as a strategy to manage weight or blood glucose.

In our courses and our book we show the science behind weight loss is about the quality of the food you eat not the calories. Certain foods talk to you genes to get you to put on weight while other foods help you lose weight and regain your health.

http://tix.yt/permanentweightloss

 Source

http://www.cmaj.ca/content/189/28/E929

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Dr Peter Dingle’s South West WA Wellness Tour

Dr Peter Dingle’s South West WA Wellness Tour

Hope you can make it to one of our talks

Toxic Overload

October 16, 7.00 pm

Harvey

http://tix.yt/toxicoverloadharvey

 

Toxic Overload

October 17, 7.00 pm

Dalyellup

http://tix.yt/toxicoverloaddalyellup

 

Your Gut Health, Microbiome and Probiotics

October 18 2017

Bunbury turf club

Blair Street Bunbury 6230 Australia

7.00-9.00 PM each night

http://tix.yt/gutmicrobiomeprobioticsbunbury

 

7 Steps To Permanent Weight Loss 

October 19 2017

Bunbury turf club

Blair Street Bunbury 6230 Australia

7.00-9.00 PM each night

http://tix.yt/weightlossbunbury

 

Toxic Overload

October 20, 9.30 am

Leshenault

http://tix.yt/toxicoverloadleshanaultam

 

Toxic Overload

October 20, 7.00 pm

Leshenault

http://tix.yt/toxicoverloadleshanaultpm

 

 

Toxic Overload

October 23, 7.00-9.00 pm

Dunsborough

http://tix.yt/toxicoverloaddunsborougham

 

 

Toxic Overload

October 24, 9.30 -11.30 am

Dunsborough

http://tix.yt/toxicoverloaddunsboroughpm

 

 

Your Gut Health, Microbiome and Probiotics

October 24, 2017

Dunsborough

St George Community Care 48 Gibney Street

 http://tix.yt/gut-healthprobioticsdunsborough

 

Albany

Dog Rock Motel seminar room

303 Middleton Road Mount Clarence 6330

7.00-9.00 PM each night

 

October 26, 2017

Your Gut Health, Microbiome and Probiotics

http://tix.yt/gutmicrobiomeprobioticsalbany

 

October 27 2017

Dangerous Beauty. The toxic truth about cosmetics and personal care products

http://tix.yt/dangerousbeautyalbany

 

October 28 2017

The 7 steps to permanent weight loss

http://tix.yt/weightlossalbany

 

Toxic Overload

We are now surrounded by long list of modern day toxic chemicals in our homes and the personal care products that are impacting on our health.  These poisons and potions are playing their role in making us sick and are linked with the increase in disease like breast cancer, hormone imbalances, thyroid problems and even infertility. Even at “so called” normal levels these chemicals contribute to diseases such as fatigue, depression, stress and anxiety and are linked with diabetes, cardio vascular disease, cancer, estrogen and hormone havoc and weight gain.

This presentation will change your attitudes to many things around you and your home, how you clean and what you put on your skin and empower you to make some simple changes to improve your health. We’ll show you that with a few simple modifications you can easily improve the health status of your home, your wellbeing and that of your family.

 

Gut Health, Microbiome and Probiotics.

Probiotics and a healthy microbiome in our digestive tract is now recognised as one of the most critical conditions for our health and wellbeing. While it is obvious when it comes to many digestive disorders recent research has shown it can be involved in virtually every form of chronic illness. A study in 2016 for example confirmed that up to 50% of Parkinson’s disease can be related to an unhealthy gut microbiome. While many skin conditions like eczema, psoriasis and even acne as well as Alzheimer’s, MS, allergies, diabetes type 1 and 2 and high blood pressure are all related to a healthy gut. Even weight gain and weight loss is influenced by your gut microbiome. Both directly and indirectly a healthy gut can determine how healthy you are and even how much weight you put on. However, a healthy gut is determined by many more factors than just supplementing with probiotics or eating yoghurt.

In this one night presentation you will learn about the importance of gut health as well as what steps you can take to improve. This night is a must to see.

 

7 Steps To Permanent Weight Loss 

Diets, counting calories and low fat foods don’t work because they are working against your genes. These diets are going against millions of years of evolution. Studies on these types of diets show impaired mental performance, poor immediate memory and slower reaction times, they lose more muscle and develop metabolic and immune system disorders. Even more disturbing people on these diets lose muscle, end up putting on more weight and die younger.

The reason is that these Diets focus on the wrong thing. They ignore the genetic, biochemical and nutritional needs of your body so they can never succeed.

Learn the secrets of weight loss and the language of talking to your genes. Learn to retune your genes to lose extra kilos of weight without dieting.

Dr Dingle will show you by focusing on nutrient dense foods, supplementation, the right protein foods, probiotics and eliminating toxins you can unlock your genes for weight loss and wellbeing without dieting and exercise.

 

Dangerous Beauty. The toxic truth about cosmetics and personal care products

(Albany Only)

The personal care and cosmetic products you use directly influence the health of your family. These products impact their hormone levels and thyroid function and are linked with weight gain. These chemicals are linked with Estrogen overload and hormone imbalances, Breast and prostate cancer, Thyroid dysfunction and hypothyroidism, Impaired immune system, Skin ageing, infertility and testosterone in males and so much more.

Most Personal care products contain parabens, phthalates, solvents, mineral oils and other hormone disrupting chemicals and you won’t even know it because they may be a “secret ingredient” or even formaldehyde hidden under another name.

We now know that many of these toxic chemicals pass through the skin and into the blood where they can accumulate and cause damage and can pass into the placenta and accumulate in breast tissue.

Every application increases the risk and exposure and of greatest concern is that it is young women and girls who are most exposed to these toxins. But no one is exempt. Even girls of 5 and 6 are showing up with high concentrations of these toxins.

The good news is that by learning a little bit and avoiding these chemicals and making a few simple changes to your lives you can make a big difference to the health of your family. Your choices today have the power to affect fertility, breast cancer and weight gain even for the next few generations.

At this presentation you will find out what you can do to protect your family health, what to avoid and what is ok.

Dr Peter Dingle PhD

Exploding old belief systems, Dr Dingle dispels myths and confusion around health and how to create long lasting wellbeing. He puts the real facts at your fingertips, then provides you with personalised options to ensure your choices get you the best out of your future.

Nobody knows wellness like Dr Peter Dingle, Australia’s most engaging and innovative thought leader on the topics of health, wellness and weight loss who presents cutting-edge science in a bold, courageous, humourous and straight-shooting manner.

Dr Dingle is Australia's most popular and qualified professional speaker. He holds 2 Degrees in Science and a PhD, 21 years as an academic at Murdoch University and written 15 books on health and wellness.

Dr Dingle has a unique ability to entertain, educate and involve simultaneously. A natural entertainer, Dr D transports delighted audiences on a journey of truth and laughter that will empower them to optimize energy and health, find better life balance and their health

Dr Peter Dingle is known both in Australia and around the world as one of the most impactful and engaging thought leaders in the Health and Wellness Movement.  Over the last 30 Years he has helped hundreds of thousands of people better their lives by cutting through medical and health myths to give the real facts on evidence-based wellness.

 

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The Essential Sleep (Part 1)

The Essential Sleep (Part 1)

In today’s busy and hectic society many see sleep as a luxury rather than what it is – a necessity.  More and more people are working overtime, and shift work trying to juggle a busy family life around their work.  Along with this, it is not unusual for both parents to be working full time.  The advent of our 24/7 society has pushed regular sleep to the side. Because of this, many men and women (and even children) wrongly consider sleep a waste of time. 

Sleep is an essential element of the human body, without it we cannot survive. Getting enough sleep is associated with energy, joy, optimistic thinking and coping with negative emotions. Despite this almost 90 percent of Australians suffer from some type sleep disorder at some stage of their lives.  Of these, 30 percent suffer from severe sleep disorders.  Very few people regularly enjoy the amount or quality of sleep that they need.  The estimated economic costs to the country from this are between $3 billion and $7 billion annually.  There are also huge, unmeasured physical, psychological, emotional and social costs. 

Sleep is complicated in the way that there are many different factors that influence the effectiveness of sleep. It’s not just duration that determines the effectiveness of said sleep, factors such as quality, frame of mind and deepness all contribute to the maximum desired outcome and even our perception of how we sleep. Many factors can play a part in the quality and quantity of our sleep and to maximise our sleep time an understanding of this is essential.     

On average a healthy person will spend around one third of their life sleeping (Duman et al, 2009).  Sleep is considered a natural periodic state of rest for the mind and body, in which the eyes will usually close and consciousness is completely or partially lost resulting in a decrease in bodily movements and responsiveness to external stimuli (Blanch et al, 2009). Inadequate hours of good quality sleep leads to a disruption to vital biological processes resulting in a decrease in cognitive function mental and physical health (Anderson et al, 2009) including impaired work performance due to a decrease in attention, judgement and responsible decision making (Volkow, 2009). 

Why we sleep

Mammals are naturally diurnal animals and sleep for humans are broken into two distinct phases. These phases, Non Rapid Eye Movement (NREM) and Rapid Eye Movement (REM), represent the depth of sleep and electrical activity in the central nervous system (CNS) (Cirelli & Tononi, 2008). However, sleep is a heightened anabolic state where rejuvenation of many organ systems occurs, especially the immune and nervous systems. NREM is further broken into phases one to three during which have different waves of sleep and cognitive perceptions, phase one for example is associated with hyper‑CNS responses. During this phase the body may quickly jerk out of steep and this will be felt as a falling sensation (Walsh, 2009). Various genetic mutations have been associated with sleep including DEC2 mutations that lower the sleep requirement from eight hours to six and the 600072 prion gene that predisposes to Fatal Familial Insomnia (Kniff in, 2009; McKusick and Kniffin, 2009). The natural circadian rhythms of the body are a result of variations in levels of circulating melatonin hormone, from the pineal gland, and also adenosine levels which increase over the course of the day (Imeri & Opp, 2009).

Among the theories on why humans sleep, scientists have proposed the following:

Sleep may be a way of recharging the brain. The brain has a chance to shut down and repair neurons and to exercise important neuronal connections that might otherwise deteriorate due to lack of activity or over activity.

Sleep gives the brain an opportunity to reorganize data to help find a solution to problem, process newly learned information and organize and archive memories.

Sleep lowers a person’s metabolic rate and energy consumption.

The cardiovascular system also gets a break during sleep. People with normal or high blood pressure experience a 20 to 30% reduction in blood pressure and 10 to 20% reduction in heart rate.

During sleep, the body has a chance to replace chemicals and repair muscles, other tissues and aging or dead cells.

In children and young adults, growth hormones are released during deep sleep (World Federation of Sleep Research and Sleep Medicine Societies

Immune function is highest when we sleep

Detoxing. There appear to be “hidden caves” inside the brain, which open up during sleep, allowing cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) to flush out potential neurotoxins, like β-amyloid, which has been associated with Alzheimer’s disease. The research discovered “hidden caves” inside the brain, which open up during sleep, allowing cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) to flush out potential neurotoxins, like β-amyloid, which has been associated with Alzheimer’s disease. The interstitial spaces in the mouse’s brain took up only 14% of the brain’s volume while it was awake. Yet, while it slept, this increased by almost two-thirds to take up fully 23% of the brain’s total volume. The effect is that potential neurotoxins, like β-amyloid, are cleared twice as fast during sleep as during waking. While many neurological diseases, like strokes and dementia, are associated with problems sleeping. It could be that lack of sleep, and restriction of the brain’s cleaning system, may cause toxic metabolites to building up, leading to long-term damage.

Most likely we sleep for a combination of these reasons

 

Part 2 and more coming

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Essential Sleep (Part 8). Sleep and the immune system

Essential Sleep (Part 8). Sleep and the immune system

Sleep, like most other processes in our body, is mediated by the interaction of cytokines and chemokines with neurotransmitters (Dilger & Johnson, 2008). During infection our sleep patterns change and interactions of cytokines, especially IL‑1 and IL‑1 2 and the neurotransmitter serotonin amplify (Dantzer et al. 2008; Lange et at. 2006). During sleep, it has been suggested that, the synapses not used during the day's activities are given an opportunity to prime and regenerate, cognitive function also rejuvenates, memories are consolidated and on a cellular level glycogen stores can re‑fuel. However, sleep deprivation has been associated with inflammatory based diseases including obesity, Cardiovascular Disease and Diabetes (lmeri & Opp, 2009).

 

Sleep deprivation has been shown to further enhance end stage renal disease, decrease vaccine efficacy as attested with both Influenza and Hepatits A vaccines, prolong wound healing, lengthen critical care stays and enhance depression or other psychiatric disorders (Lange et al. 2003; Miller et al. 2004; Koch et al. 2009).

Several recent studies report that reducing sleep to 6.5 or fewer hours for successive nights causes potentially harmful metabolic, hormonal and immune changes.  All of the changes are similar to those detected in the normal aging process (Cobb, 2002) and so sleep deprivation could be the biggest indicator of how long you live (Sateia, et al., 2004).  There is a strong link between sleep deprivation and low immune system function (Redwine, et al., 2003).  A reduction of sleep makes people more prone to infection and potentially more prone to cancer; one study found that poor sleep was associated with a 60 percent increase in breast cancer. 

In one study of 153 volunteers who spent less time in bed, or who spent their time in bed tossing and turning instead of snoozing, were much more likely to catch a cold when viruses were dripped into their noses, while those who slept longer and more soundly resisted infection better. The study showed that even relatively minor sleep disturbances can influence the body's reaction to cold viruses ( Cohen et al  Archives of Internal Medicine). The men and women who reported fewer than seven hours of sleep on average were 2.94 times more likely to develop sneezing, sore throat and other cold symptoms than those who reported getting eight or more hours of sleep each night. Volunteers who spent less than 92 percent of their time in bed asleep were 5 1/2 times more likely to become ill than better sleepers, they found.

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Study shows more coffee helps reduce muscle wastage in ageing men.

Study shows more coffee helps reduce muscle wastage in ageing men.

Sarcopenia is an age-related loss of muscle mass and strength. Coffee has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties that have been shown to be inversely related to the mechanism of sarcopenia. In animal studies coffee attenuated the reduction of age-related muscle weight and muscle power, and stimulated regeneration of injured muscle compared to controls. Furthermore, pro-inflammatory mediators such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin 6 decreased after coffee treatment

In this study with a sample consisted of 1,781 men who were at least 60 years of age, compared to the group of individuals who drank less than one cup of coffee a day, people who consumed at least 3 cups showed a 57% decreased sarcopenia. Good news for the coffee drinkers was that the decrease was not significant when the daily coffee consumption was 1 or 2 cups. The results of this study suggest that consuming at least 3 cups of coffee per day was associated with a lower prevalence of sarcopenia in elderly elderly men.

Coffee has phenolic compounds such as chlorogenic acid and caffeic acid that have strong antioxidant activity and anti-inflammatory effects. A number of studies have now shown habitual coffee consumption is associated with lower prevalence of diabetes or pre-diabetes, insulin resistance, stroke, Parkinson's disease, and cardiovascular disease. There is also evidence that coffee consumption is associated with decreased risks for some types of cancer. Not to mention the antiaging effect I recently reported on my posts.

Sarcopenia is the progressive loss of muscle mass and strength as we age. Several factors are related to the pathogenesis of sarcopenia. Age-related changes such as decreased levels and sensitivity of anabolic hormones, lack of physical activity, nutritional deficiencies, and comorbid diseases all contribute to the onset and progression of sarcopenia. These changes are hypothesized to lead inflammation with increased circulating levels of inflammatory cytokines, oxidative stress, suppressed muscle autophagy, and increased apoptosis by altering intra- and extracellular processes. In addition, oxidative metabolism generates reactive oxygen species, which alters skeletal muscle mitochondrial DNA and can lead to sarcopenia.

Source

https://synapse.koreamed.org/DOIx.php?id=10.4082/kjfm.2017.38.3.141

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Essential Sleep (Part 5). Sleep and weight gain

Essential Sleep (Part 5). Sleep and weight gain

Sleep and weight

Obesity in another disorder linked with insomnia. Research shows that diets that are higher in saturated fats are more susceptible to chronic diseases and disorders which includes insomnia (Novak et al. 1995). This is an alarming fact as 20% of the population of the United States of American are overweight or obese (Patterson et al. 2004).

Many studies, including one spanning twenty years, have tested the hypothesis that sleep and obesity are linked and the majority of results show positive correlations (Gangwisch et al. 2005). Further studies, with over 500,000 total participants via meta‑analysis have supported obesity and insomnia in adults and children (Cappuccio et al. 2008). The trends of increasing BMI and reduced sleep hours appear to go hand in hand, along with sleeping troubles related to Sleep Apnoea often seen in obese patients.

This link between Obesity and the symptoms of its associated diseases demonstrates a common trend towards diminishing an individual’s peak performance. Obesity and many of the health conditions which result from it increase the lower productivity levels associated with lower mental and cognitive functioning.

Obesity is also a serious factor in poor sleep habits. In a number of studies obesity was associated with "reduced sleeping hours " (Ko et al (2007). Obesity, particularly abdominal and upper body obesity, is the most significant risk factor for Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA). Patients with sleep apnea often experience daytime sleepiness and difficulty concentrating (Teran-Santos et al, 1999). Studies have also shown a strong association between sleep apnea and the risk of traffic accidents (Terán-Santos et al (1999).  In fact, subjects suffering from sleep apnea were at a higher risk than those who had consumed alcohol to be involved in a traffic accident. This has major implications, particularly for overweight and obese workers using any form of equipment of driving vehicles.

This lack in sleep will then leave the employee going to the work already feeling tired, irritable and stressed, therefore making it difficult to concentrate, and highly increasing the chances of being injured or making a mistake which may put fellow workmates in danger (Lynch, 2005) It is situations like this, where the worker comes to work already feeling tired, that the employee is putting his safety and other's safety at risk.

Shift workers are known to be a high-risk group for obesity. In the current study population, rotating-shift workers showed a higher distribution of the highest body mass index compared with daytime workers

In a study of the brains of 24 participants after both a good and a bad night’s sleep. after disturbed sleep, there was increased activity in the depths of the brain, areas which are generally associated with rewards and automatic behaviour. It seems a lack of sleep robs people of their self-control and so their good intentions are quickly forgotten.

What we have discovered is that high-level brain regions required for complex judgments and decisions become blunted by a lack of sleep, while more primal brain structures that control motivation and desire are amplified.”

In other words: lack of sleep robs people of their self-control and so their good intentions are quickly forgotten.

On top of this, the researchers found that after being deprived of sleep, participants displayed greater craving for high-calorie junk food. The more sleep-deprived they were, the greater the cravings. A stufy of 13,284 teenagers found that those who slept poorly also made poor decisions about food. Similarly, a Swedish study found that at a buffet, tired people were more likely to load up their plates.

The link has even been made from poor sleep through to food shopping. A Swedish study found that men who were sleep-deprived bought, on average, 9% more calories than those who’d had a good night’s sleep. These results were likely the result of the poor decision-making. It had been thought that the tendency to eat more after poor sleep was related to the so-called ‘hunger hormone’ ghrelin. But the latest studies suggest that it’s simple self-control that is most important in causing the sleep-deprived to over-indulge.

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Mothers BPA levels linked with birth defects.

Mothers BPA levels linked with birth defects.

Evidence from animal studies shows that prenatal exposure to bisphenol A (BPA), a ubiquitous endocrine-disrupting chemical, is associated with adverse reproductive outcomes in females and males. In females exposure during early gestation, a critical period for reproductive development, is of particular concern. The Anogenital distance (AGD) is a sensitive biomarker of the fetal hormonal balance and a measure of reproductive toxicity in animal studies. In some studies, the daughters of BPA-exposed dams have shorter AGD than controls.

The results of this study showed BPA was detectable in 94% of women. In analysis of the 381 eligible subjects, maternal BPA concentration was inversely associated with infant AGD-AC

In support of animal studies this human study shows that BPA may have toxic effects on the female reproductive system in humans, as it does in animal models. Higher first-trimester BPA exposure was associated with significantly shorter AGD in daughters, suggesting that BPA may alter the hormonal environment of the female fetus.

Bisphenol A (BPA) is a synthetic chemical widely used in consumer products, including food and drink containers, thermal receipts, medical equipment, and other plastic products. BPA is detectable in over 90% of the population in the United States, and may act on the endocrine system in numerous ways, including binding to and activating numerous nuclear and membrane endocrine receptors, and stimulating changes in estrogen, androgen, progesterone, and thyroid hormone activity.

Dozens of studies in humans have examined BPA exposure in relation to a wide range of health end points, including reproductive, perinatal, and pediatric outcomes. Many animal studies and in vitro studies show that many tissues and organ systems (including the mammary gland, prostate gland, adipose tissue, reproductive system, and brain) are sensitive to BPA. In animal and human studies, BPA can cross the placenta to enter fetal circulation. Because fetal development is a period of rapid cell proliferation and differentiation, tissue development, and organ growth, prenatal exposure to environmental chemicals such as BPA may be of particular concern.

source

https://ehp.niehs.nih.gov/ehp875/

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Health and productivity effects of poor sleep

Health and productivity effects of poor sleep

Obvious symptoms of sleep deprivation constant yawning and the tendency to doze off when not active for a while; for example, when watching television, Grogginess when waking in the morning Sleepy grogginess experienced all day long (sleep inertia) Poor concentration and mood changes (more irritable).

Disease

Some of the physical effects found from long term fatigue are heart disease, diabetes, high blood pressure, gastrointestinal disorders and depression (Workplace health and safety QLD, 2008).  A study conducted by Andersen involving rats also showed sleep deprivation affects the expression of genes related to metabolic processes, response to stimulus and signalling pathways (Andersen et al, 2009). 

Numerous studies have shown that even a little bit of sleep deprivation decreases efficiency and increases risk of disease, including cardiovascular disease, cancer and diabetes.  Sleep deprivation has been shown to negatively affect endocrine (hormones) and metabolic functioning as well as nervous system balance (Nilsson, et al., 2004).  Sleep deprivation is associated with an increased concentration of cortisol plus other indicators of increased stress such as elevations in pulse rate, body temperature and adrenaline secretion (Vgontzas, et al.,1999).  Sleep deprivation also appears to increase blood concentrations of certain chemicals called cytokines and C-reactive proteins (Irwine, 2001 and Vgontzas, et al., 1998), indicating an inflammatory reaction.  The effect of unremitting low-grade inflammation may be to damage the inner walls of the arteries, which sometimes leads to vessel narrowing, high blood pressure, stroke, and heart disease (Irwine, 2001).  During truncated sleep, your heart might have to work harder, constricting blood vessels and increasing blood pressure even more, which could conceivably result in a heart attack or stroke (Martins, 2003). 

Sleep is as important to the human body as food and water, but most of us don’t get enough sleep.  Insufficient sleep or disruptions to the sleep contribute to adverse health effects. Numerous studies have also shown that even a little bit of sleep deprivation decreases efficiency and increases risk of disease, including cardiovascular disease. 

Initial changes to cardiovascular system from insomnia include hypertension, which is a potent co‑morbidity for other cardiovascular diseases. Hypertension has been linked to reduced sleep duration, with the highest correlation shown under 6 hours sleep per night (Gottlieb et al. 2006). However, associations have also been made between sleep of over 9 hours per night and hypertension and obesity. Furthermore this has not been supported at all in some studies and PPI in one older North American population actually showed a reduced risk of hypertension (Phillips, BOková and Enrigh, 2009.).

A study of 71,617 female health professionals found that sleeping fewer than five hours per night was associated with a 39 percent increase in the risk of coronary heart disease; even six hours per night showed an increase of 18 percent compared to sleeping eight hours per night (Najib, et al., 2003).  In an analysis of data on more than one million people, the levels of nearly all forms of death were two-and-a-half times higher for people who slept four hours or less compared to those who slept between seven and eight hours on average

A study of 71,617 female health professionals found that sleeping fewer than five hours per night was associated with a 39 percent increase in the risk of coronary heart disease; even six hours per night showed an increase of 18 percent compared to sleeping eight hours per night.  In an analysis of data on more than one million people, the levels of nearly all forms of death were two-and-a-half times higher for people who slept four hours or less compared to those who slept between seven and eight hours on average

Experimentally, sleep deprivation has been shown to negatively affect glucose metabolism and to enhance factors associated with Type 2 diabetes (Nilsson, et al., 2004).  Research has also shown that people who experience sleep disorders were as much as three times as likely to develop Type 2 diabetes (Kawakami, 2004).  Subjects in one study demonstrated impaired glucose tolerance for ten days after four hours of sleep deprivation (Spiegel, et al.,1999).  It is also found that sleep deprivation can play a role in obesity.  Sleep deficits bring about physiologic changes in the hormonal signals that promote hunger and, perhaps thereby, obesity (Spiegel, et al., 2004).  One study found that after two days of sleep curtailment the subjects had reduced levels of the fat-derived hormone leptin and increased levels of the stomach-derived hormone ghrelin.  These hormones are responsible for regulating hunger and appetite (Spiegel, et al., 2004).  These hormonal differences are likely to increase appetite, which could help explain the relative high BMI in short sleepers. 

 

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